Ponyfinder in Equestria – Zebras and their lands.

Next up on the Ponyfinder pony types we have the Zebra.

The dry plains of tropical Alkebalkan, with their seasonal rains, lakes, and streams, may support nomads and the occasional village built around a reliable water source, but the true Zebra civilization is are built along the mighty rivers and tributaries that cascade from the interior mountains and jungles to nourish the great river valleys of the Neighle, the Cantor, and the Niker. There, along the green veins of fertile land isolated by distance and the surrounding dryland hills and mountains from the great and terrible jungles, lost or hidden civilizations, and magical mysteries and storms of the deep interior, can be found the ancient cities, fertile irrigated fields, and megalithic enchantments that have been the sanctuary of the Zebra across four ages of the world and throughout uncounted cataclysms.

Here, in the lands of dusty Kemet, where even the greatest external powers and disturbances are muted by ancient wards and the timeless rhythms of an antique land, the Zebra have built what may well be the oldest extant civilization in the world – said in their most ancient tales to have been founded mere weeks after the world and the peoples of Equus were brought forth from the alchemy of creation, when the ancient gods brewed their ingredients in the Abyss of the Void – Tehom, Tiamat, the Giningugap – upon the Colorless Radiance of Exploding Suns, the Light of Rey, and the Fires of Muspell, to bring forth a new world and its Peoples.

Ptah the Artificer, the Opener of the Ways, guided the Zebras – his chosen folk – to their destined homes, and along those rich valleys the ancient Zebra settled, gathering in tribal villages where the ley lines and power-nexi of the lands were bountiful enough to be harnessed with crude and primitive megalithic sigils hacked from the virgin stones of the hills. There the Zebra spread, and multiplied.

Every race of Equus has it’s gifts. That of the Zebra is slow and subtle, but more versatile than most – an ability to sense and combine the natural magical properties of the plants, animals, and minerals of the world around them. While any given individual may develop different aspects of that power, the creation of alchemical magics, wards major, magical architecture, megalithic enchantments channeling the occult energies of the land, and personal sanctums are all natural developments of their abilities – as are shamanic talents and even calling upon the spirits of the dead.

And of those potentials… the compounding of alchemical magics from local reagents, calling upon spirits, and creating personal sanctums were by far the easiest for a primitive villager to pursue, and so became the foundation of Zebra civilization.

With a built-in incentive to seek out rare reagents and the secrets of distant lands, and the great riverways that were the blessing of Ptah to provide an easy path and constant guide, the Beaker Traders, Seekers of Alchemy, soon united the Zebra lands in a loose web of trade and social contacts. Cities grew, and created support networks of geomantic structures and wards.

Centuries later, the Naquadah villages found the secret of the amplifying reagent that bears their name – and with that discovery Ptah stated that the Zebra required his presence no longer, stepped down from leadership, and returned to his home in the places beyond the stars to begin to create anew.

Ponis, lord of Marephis – the largest and wealthiest city of Kemet – and once the Vizier of Ptah, took Ptah’s place as the leader of the Council of the Neighle Tribes, coordinator of the geomantic network that helped maintain the prosperity of the realm. His son turned his role into that of the High Chieftain – and HIS son forged the Crimson Philosophers Crown of the Neighle – an artifact which granted him direct awareness, and limited control, of the geomantic systems that regulated the flooding of the Neighle, provided safety from the beasts of the jungles, and brought prosperity in so many ways to the lands along the Neighle.

And thus Djer became the first true Pharaoh of the Neighle, a god-king regarded as being little less divine than Ptah himself – for the hooves of Ptah had wrought life and land, but from the hooves of Djer flowed wealth. There was an abundance of grain and fruit, fine stone and strong wood, copper and gold – and luxuries to trade for the vital reagents which empowered the alchemy that brought health, long life, pleasure, fertility, and more to the peoples of Kemet.

Soon enough, the Zebras of the Cantor and Niker river valleys sought out the secrets of the Philosophers Crown and forged the Verdant and Azure Crowns to regulate their lands along those great rivers as well – and the wealth, power, and culture of Kemet would echo in legend across the ages.

But Anedjib of the Neighle entitled himself Nebuy – “The Second Lord” – and in madness and unbridled ambition sought to ascend to join Ptah in the places of the Gods beyond the stars. He set his mystic architects to constructing a megalithic gate empowered by Naquadah – the “Bent Pyramid” – intended to force open the way into the heavens that he might become equal with Ptah.

But such hubris was properly punished. The gate opened into the dark between the realms, not into the places of the gods – and through it came the Crawling Chaos, Nephren-Ka, the Black Pharaoh, who cast aside the Crown of the Philosophers and ruled by raw might, dispatching his Apophi – the Flying Serpents that hunted at his will – as a scourge against any who dared defy his dark will in word or deed.

The three crowns of Kemet were united in friendship to stand against Nephren-Ka, revealing that in their harmonious combination lay all the colors and strengths of the worlds magic. The Zebra rose against the Dark One. At the end of that struggle the Black Pharaoh was cast out into the void once more – but there was a price for that choice and victory. The thousand varied colors of the Zebra were touched by the outer darkness, and divided between that and light. Henceforth the very flesh of the Zebra would display only the light and darkness, entangled upon their hides as they were in every mortal heart, neither one thing nor another.

And the first of the Nameless Kings donned the now-unified Triple Crown of the Neighle, Cantor, and Niker – claiming only the title Nebra, the Sun King of the Three Riverlands. Lord of United Kemet.

But the division between the Light and the Darkness persisted. The border tribes turned often to the Darkness, drawing on its dangerous power of Spirits and Tulpa, Channeling and Landrule, as a weapon and defense against the beasts and dangers of the great jungles of the interior and the perils of the wilds. But within the great cities that formed the beating heart of Kemet, the subtle arts of the light were preferred, and architects, alchemists, and warders gathered to share their enlightenment and teach their arts.

There were centuries of quarrels and minor conflicts between the city-dwellers and the nomads of the dry lands – but the Triple Crown and the undoubted might of the Nebra Philosopher Kings held a fragile unity.

The long centuries of disharmony drew at last to an end when the Griffon Invasions struck at the great cities, leading them to extend a hasty invitation to the darker arts of the nomads and their shamans – and the ancient order of the Beaker Traders gathered in defense of Kemet’s core, calling in countless favors and the spirits controlled by the dark arts of the nomadic desert tribes.

The battles were bloody and terrible, but eventually the Nebra Alchemist formerly known as Prince Neighbetre donned the triple crown and sacrificed his right hoof and eye in the ritual to hurl the malignant, near-eternal, unquenchable blaze of Fiendfyre – refined Marenium distilled into the most terrible alchemical weapon that the world had ever known – from the sky upon the griffon encampments and brought the Griffon Wars to an end and peace to the Middle Kingdom.

Even now, despite the passing of ages, the terrible blue light of pockets of Fiendfyre glows still beneath the surface of Equus in places in the hills and badlands, waiting to burn, twist, and poison the unwary – or to mutate the occasional passing animal into a monstrous horror.

And in the Middle Kingdom… the Darkness was balanced against the Light. Dark Stelea rose within the desert just past the borders, and pyramid-tombs were constructed to hold the ranks of the Ushabtiu – the alchemical focus-bodies through which the dead might be called in defence of their descendents – in stasis against a future need. Richly rewarded and funded, the surviving Beaker Traders reached outwards, sailing their wicker ships of dark, alchemically-treated, reeds into the dangerous realms beyond the shores of Kemet.

The Pharoah became indeed the Nebra, advised and supported by a spirit-council of the deceased kings who had come before – although this did lead to occasional power struggles when the Light and Dark factions amongst those councilors favored different candidates. Fortunately, those were always limited to struggles between the great houses, and were never allowed to become general civil wars.

With their lands warded by megalithic magic tied to the very roots of the world, even the reign of Discord across the seas in Equestria had little effect on Kemet. During that time the reigning Nebra opened his realm to give sanctuary to many thousands of refugees, and opened his warehouses – filled with the surpluses of long centuries of prosperity – to feed and supply them.

But a new Nebra arose over Kemet, who – when Discord was sealed in stone – gave in to the voices of tradition and sent the refugees home to rebuild, even if she WAS generous with supplies and assistance.

Most of those refugees were glad enough to go. They found Zebrica / Kemet’s casual acceptance of the wandering dead (no matter if they were powered by alchemy and links to the outer planes rather than by negative energy) more than a little disquieting – and the widespread acceptance of the arts of darkness quite terrifying, no matter if it’s sigils were emblazoned upon their hosts very hides and obviously natural to them. The tales they took home painted Zebrica as a haunted place, filled with ancient tombs and dungeons where the Darkness was permitted to reign freely over the countryside surrounding the great cities that were only protected by the consecrated light of the ancient Temples of Ptah.

There was enough truth to the tales for the legends persist to this day, casting Zebra traders and wanderers as potential evil enchanters and implying that a visit to Kemet might as well be an expedition into the depths of the underworld – encouraging the isolation which has helped maintain Kemet’s changeless social stability to this day.

Still, not even the ancient wards and megalithic anchors of Zebrica can forever hold back the tides of change. Today, as ever-increasing numbers of visitors, scholars, and outside traders visit ancient Kemet, the Council of Deceased Nebra has once again split between whether they need a Warrior-King to defend their land against menacing changes or a Philosopher-King to lead its adaption to them – and so the assassin’s blades are being sharpened and poisons brewed in anticipation of the coming power struggle when the current Nebra joins his advisors in death and competing candidates seek to claim the office of Nebra and the Triple Crown of Kemet.

The rumors say that it will not be long now.

Kemet / Zebrica is currently welcoming adventurers/pawns from beyond it’s borders, is overrun with forgotten ancient complexes where dark powers have gotten out of control that need to be raided and brought back under control, is stuffed full of ancient temples, lost treasures, hidden tombs whose owners only bother with reaching down to defend them out of habit (as a rule, if the dead stop picking up their mail and paying their taxes for more than fifty years, their tombs are considered abandoned, and raiding permits are made readily available), fabulous intoxicants, willing companions (since contraceptive and STD-preventing or curing potions are extremely cheap), elder artifacts, and ancient wards. It offers a ready supply of potions and other disposable alchemical goodies for the connoisseur, skillful weapon and armor-smiths with some experience with other races, and has pretty much everything else that an adventurer could want.

It’s a good deal more dangerous than most of Equestria, simply because the people of Kemet tend to regard killing someone in much the same way that other cultures regard eunuching a male. The victim is cut off from some of the pleasures of life, can no longer have children, loses eligibility for some jobs, and takes a social hit – but they can still come to family gatherings and participate in most things. That’s one of the reasons why Kemet is BETTER. It’s not like being dead in most places!

Zebra Racial Template (32 CP / +1 ECL, normally added to the Basic Pony Template).

The Subtle Weave:

  • Pulse Of The World: Occult Sense / Natural Magic (6 CP). Zebras can automatically identify plants and animals (or pieces thereof) and can sense the inherent magical properties of plants, animals, minerals, and the land itself, although they may need to make a perception check for unfamiliar items. As a side benefit, they gain a +2 bonus on Survival, Herbalism, Heal, and any checks required to use their Natural Alchemy ability, below.
  • Natural Alchemy: Create Artifact, Specialized and Corrupted / only for “alchemical” creations compounded from natural magical components (2 CP). Note that this doesn’t require that the user be a “spellcaster”, or call for expending money on unspecified ingredients; this is first edition style alchemy; if you need manticore venom, a pinch of powdered hematite, and petals from a blue rose, than that’s what you need; the effect and caster level will take care of itself.
  • Alchemical Gatherer / Minor Privilege (3 CP). A traveling Zebra, or one who lives in the wilds, can automatically collect rare herbs, fungi, and other bits and pieces with which to make various alchemical artifacts. This provides an Average lifestyle by default and means that a Zebra will always be stocked with a selection of useful components – enough to keep a stock of (Wisdom) Trivial and (Wis Mod +2) Minor alchemical artifacts available every day.
  • Tribal Lore / Specific Knowledge of (Int + 3) trivial mystical formula (free) and (Int Mod + 3) minor mystical formulas (1 CP). Pretty much every Zebra colt or filly will pick up the formulas for a selection of trivial alchemical creations using readily-found local reagents during childhood. True, the adventuring applications for spooky faces vapor, instant cleaning powder, tasty sparkling beverages, day-of-flavor chewing gum, a minor healing effect suitable for fixing cuts, bruises, and small blemishes, and similar stuff is limited, but even the “Minor” formula – reasonably effective curatives, icing over a surface, extremely slippery grease (and other effects approximately equivalent to first or second level spells) can be quite useful. While major creations will cost 1 SP each, any Zebra who really cares to make an effort can learn a small library worth of useful formulas.

Initiate Of Mysteries:

  • Guidance of Ptah / Witchcraft II. Every Zebra has a bit of Psychic Strength (although on Equus they generally power their abilities with Mana) and three basic witchcraft powers to use. In terms of the setting, Zebra acquire the powers they were meant to have – although training can help focus and develop them. In game terms, of course, the choice is up to the player – as is any Corruption or Specialization they may choose to apply. Witchcraft powers, of course, tend to be short ranged and relatively weak, if normally quite versatile (12 CP).
    • A Shaman might have Dreamfaring, Glamour, and the Inner Eye, all specialized in dealing with Spirits for Increased Effect. With the power to see, hear, touch, communicate with, and influence the spirits of nature and the dead, you’ve pretty much got the basic shamanism down right there.
    • A Scout might have The Adamant Will, Shadowweave (focused on Stealth), and Witchsight, – gaining the ability to conceal his or her aura and resist mental attacks, the ability to travel unseen, and an array of enhanced senses.
    • A Warrior might have Elfshot (Specialized for Increased Effect / only to add specific injury effects when he or she damages a target), Healing (Specialized for Increased Effect / only for use on themselves so they can keep going despite massive injuries, and Witchfire (Specialized in charging weapons with various energies, giving them the equivalent of a +2 enchantment, +1 of which may be a special power).
    • A Poisons Expert might have Healing or Hyloka (in either case specialized so as to provide some immunity to their own poisons), Witchfire (specialized in extracting and infusing poisons, including making small toxic clouds), and Witchsight (allows the easy detection and treatment of poisons and the gathering of ingredients for poisons).
  • Many Zebra take a Pact – typically Guardianship, Missions, Taboos, Duties, Rituals, or Essence – to gain an additional advanced power. For some examples…
    • Master Alchemist: Path of Water / Brewing allows a Zebra to make his or her trivial and minor, alchemical artifacts on the spot, so that they can stop deciding what they’ve got ready in advance and just produce things as needed.
    • Bestial Mindlink: A Scout might take a Witchcraft Companion – probably a hawk or some other swift-flying creature – so as to be able to readily survey distant areas and have it carry messages.
    • Lore of Battle: A Warrior might have the ability to draw on the strength of his or her ancestors, shouting out an ancient battle-cry to activate Wrath of the Sea (+6 Str) or some similar benefit.
    • Within The Blood: Poison experts often become so saturated with venom that their very touch becomes deadly. That’s Venomed Touch, Corrupted for Increased Effect / the user cannot safely give blood, is slightly hazardous to bandage or use the Heal skill on (possibly making the would-be “Good Samaritan” quite ill on a “1″), and leaves the user sterile – perhaps just as well, as any personal involvement would be likely to make their partner quite ill in any case.

Many And Varied Talents:

  • Zebra Bonus Feat: Zebra get one bonus feat taken from among the many gifts of their minor gods. While there are quite a few available (including many of the advanced withcraft powers), some common examples include:
    • Word of Hathor (or Ma’at) the Guardian of Life’s Order: Sanctum. From the early days many a Zebra has found their roots in the land, allowing them to create a personal Place of Power in which to practice their arts. This is perhaps the most common of all the divine gifts, found in many young Zebra who grow up to follow in the footsteps of their ancestors, knowing their place in the world and content with it. Thus you find farmers, smiths, shopkeepers, and more who have sunk their roots into the earth of their homes and found unmatched skills and gifts in that bond.
    • Hoof of Ptah the Traveler: The defining gift of the ancient explorers and wanderers of the Zebra tribes – the Beaker Traders. Double Enthusiast, Specialized and Corrupted for Increased Effect (6 CP worth of Innate Enchantment / 5000 GP Value)/only for Innate Enchantment. By rearranging their various talismans and ornaments a Beaker Trader may start each day anew with a selection of “magical items” valued at up to 5000 GP – although, while “uses per day” is allowable, all such items must be permanent in nature (6 CP). Note that – in foreign lands – a “100 GP” +1 Competence Bonus to Speak Language (allowing the user to speak the local language) is a definite favorite.
    • Lore of Amunet, the Illuminator of Chaos: Adept. The user may select four skills which may be purchased at half price form now on. Normally one is social, one magical, one physical, and one mental, reflecting the balance of Ma’at (6 CP).
    • Keys of Anubis, The Book of Going Forth By Day: Anubis grants the ability to call on the wisdom and assistance of the spirits of the dead – usually those who are willing to aid their descendants. Leadership with the Exotic Type (Spirits) modifier, Corrupted/Spirits ONLY and they definitely have minds of their own (6 CP).
    • Gift of Seshat, Lady of Wisdom: Seshat grants expertise in magical architecture, allowing those she favors to build mighty structures. Mystic Artist / Architecture, Specialized in megalithic stone structures. Simple wood or clay brick does not endure, and is not favored by Seshat (3 CP) and Professional / Architecture and Engineering, Specialized in megalithic stone structures (3 CP).
    • Bite of Wadjet, The Serpent of the Delta: Poison Use. A Zebra blessed byWadjet need never fear self-poisoning (6 CP).
    • Whisper of Sekhemet, Lore Unchained: Those who hear the voice of Sekhemet upon the winds are granted knowledge of the myriad alchemical wonders, both bright and terrible, which can be compounded from the stuff of the world about. Still, those who hear are regarded with caution; Sekhemet cares not if you listen to the lore of life and healing, or death and poisons, whether you brew balefire destruction or gifts of fertility and fruits for the fields. All that matters… is that you hear. Fast Learner, Specialized and Corrupted for Increased Effect (+3 SP/Level), only to buy Alchemical Formula (6 CP).
    • Word of Isis, Lady of Magic: Those touched by Isis gain hidden powers of witchery, whether for good or ill, gaining Witchcraft III, and additional four basic witchcraft powers (6 CP)
    • The Touch of Geb, The Walker of the Dawn: Landwarding: Geb grants attunement to the deep currents of magic which flow through the earth and the ability to coax a bit of that power into experession through petroglyphs, statues, shrines, and landscaping – a discipline also known as Feng Shui. Major Privilege (6 CP): A Zebra touched by Geb may spend an hour or so each day to shape the energies of the land – bestowing abilities equivalent to those bestowed by a Ward Major on the protected area. In general, whenever a new power is added (whether by adding more support to an existing landward or by creating a new one), there is a 50% chance per power that the creators will be able to choose it and a similar chance of it being determined randomly. Once that determination is made, the properties of a Ward are fixed.
      • One Landwarder can protect an encampment, house and gardens, or other small area, granting a single minor power. A landwarder who dies on the job counts towards this total.
      • Two Landwarders grant a second minor power OR expand the protected area to a village and it’s fields, a, mansion and it’s grounds, or a small castle. One landwarder who dies on the job can count towards this total.
      • Four Landwarders can do both. Two landwarders who died on the job may count for this total.
      • Seven Landwarders can grant a third minor power OR expand the protected area to a town and it’s outworks or a great castle. Three landwarders who died on the job may count for this total.
      • Nine Landwarders can do both. Four landwarders who died on the job may count for this total.
      • Twelve Landwarders can grant a fourth minor power OR expand the protected area to a city, a small valley, or a cluster of farming villages and their fields. Five landwarders who died on the job may count for this total.
      • Sixteen Landwarders can do both. Seven landwarders who died on the job may count for this total.
      • Twenty-One Landwarders can expand the protected area to a metropolis, a town and the farming hamlets that cluster around it, or a large valley OR grant a Major Power in addition to the four Minor Powers. Up to nine landwarders who died on the job may count for this total.
      • Twenty-five Landwarders can do both. Up to ten landwarders who died on the job may count for this total.
      • Thirty-Six Landwarders, can add a second Major Power in addition to the four Minor Powers. Up to twelve landwarders who died on the job may count for this total. Unfortunately, the area protected cannot be expanded past a metropolis, a town and the farming hamlets that cluster around it, or a large valley
      • Forty-Nine Landwarders can add a third Major power to the four Minor Powers. Up to eighteen landwarders who died on the job may count for this total.
      • Finally, Sixty-Four or more Landwarders can create a ward-equivalent which grants five minor and three major ward powers – but this is the effective limit of their abilities. Up to twenty-four landwarders who died on the job may count for this total.
        • Landwarding can be built with Innate Enchantment or Mana and Reality Editing and probably in other ways if I wanted to bother – but all of them produce roughly similar results at a comparable cost and are far, FAR, more complicated – and this is bad enough already.
    • The Breath of Set, Wrath of the Burning Sands: Witchcraft / The Birth Of Flames. The construct always appears to be a thing of whirling sands and black fire. The touched by Set are subtly urged towards the most destructive solutions and frontal assaults and often seem to be heralds of battle and death (6 CP).
    • The Tongue of Apep, Heir of the Crawling Chaos: The Black Pharaoh has left his mark, and it can not always be denied. Some ill-aspected births will bear this burden. Mana-Powered Negative Energy Channeling (3 CP) with Conversion to a single negative-energy related psychic effect of up to level two (3 CP) is not all that powerful – but it is the start of a path to a wide variety of terrible powers. Those who advance too far along this path… will become little more than a thing of living shadows, the light which once displayed itself upon their very hides lost to darkness (6 CP).
    • Dice of Bes, Lord of Fortunes: Luck with +2 Bonus Uses, Corrupted/only for Skill Checks and Saving Throws (6 CP).
    • Fountains of Tefnut, the Waters of Life: The waters of Tefnut rain down around those she favors, washing away evil. Presence, Specialized for Increased Effect (two first level spells; Create Water and Bless Water)/ the user may only pick Wis Mod + 1, 1 Minimum) targets within ten feet each round, although this selection is a free action. Each such target will be automatically hit with two gallons of water per level of the user which also has the effect of a flask of holy water. Sadly, this is of little use for resale thanks to the enormous dilution (6 CP).

The Ushabtiu Feats: Basically this is that art of binding a body on the material plane to a controlling spirit (normally a dead person) on the outer planes using a sympathetic link- most often a bit of the spirits original body that’s been preserved somehow. There are a lot of variants.

  • Gift of Kauket-Re the Black Sun: Corpse Ushabtiu (6 CP): Binding a deceased body to it’s original spirit creates quasi-undead. This is easy – it’s been known to happen spontaneously – but people rarely react to it very well, and for good reason; quasi-undead corpses/skeletons/zombies are ready receptacles for negative energy. Unless carefully and regularly purged of such forces, they tend to devolve into full-scale undead – either generating their own echo of the linked spirit and becoming “standard” undead horrors or (on particularly horrific occasions) drawing the original spirit back from the outer planes to become free-willed, level-advancing, evil abominations. This technique calls for:
    • Ritual Magic, Specialized in Necromantic Rituals for Reduced Cost (3 CP).
    • Power Words, Specialized for Reduced Cost and Corrupted for Increased Effect (stores rituals as if they were third level spells) / only for Necromantic Effects, requires various alchemical or otherwise unpleasant components (3 CP). Most makers of Corpse Ushabtiu keep a few prepared rituals (the precursors of “memorized spells”) at the ready. The more sensible ones usually have ways of dealing with something going wrong ready. Crazier ones often have some way to summon a bunch of skeletons or something.
    • While this is the most primitive, cheapest, easiest, and most general of the Ushabtiu disciplines, it’s also the most problematic, easily abused, and messiest. The ease and cheapness keeps it in unsettlingly widespread use, the amount of “toxic waste” it generates keeps it unpopular. Many or most practitioners are less than reputable.
  • Hoof of Anput-Hesat, bringer of Life through Death, Goddess of Predation. Animal Ushabtiu (6 CP): Binding an animal’s body to a spirit after using alchemy to permanently destroy much of it’s mind is fairly inexpensive and provides a fair chunk of the sensations of true life for the directing spirit- but is obviously temporary and generally clumsy; most animals don’t live all that long and very few are capable of using most tools and powers. Animal Ushabtiu are even more awkward on Equus, where most sizeable animals are intelligent and civilized. This technique calls for:
    • Basic Zebra Alchemy to sedate and decerebrate the animals (no cost).
    • Witchcraft / Summoning, Specialized and Corrupted for Reduced Cost / requires mildly expensive rituals, alchemical preparations, the use of a piece of the original body to provide a link, and can only be used for this particular trick (2 CP).
    • Witchcraft / Flesh Like Mist, Specialized and Corrupted for Reduced Cost / requires mildly expensive rituals, alchemical preparations, can only be used in conjunction with Blessing (below) to make the use of a piece of the original body to provide a link, and can only be used to create “anthro” (or, on Equus, “Zebroid”) animal forms and make other minor tweaks to suit the spirit (2 CP). .
    • Blessing, Specialized and Corrupted / only to allow the use of Flesh Like Mist (Above) on prepared animal bodies, requires mildly expensive rituals and alchemical preparations (2 CP).
  • Breath of Tatenen: Royal Ushabtiu are full-blown constructs, controlled as needed by the spirit they’re bound to. While they can be extremely powerful, and can, if upgraded enough, offer many of the sensations of life, they are also extremely expensive. This technique calls for:
    • Witchcraft / Summoning, Specialized and Corrupted for Reduced Cost / requires mildly expensive rituals, alchemical preparations, the use of a piece of the original body to provide a link, and can only be used for this particular trick (2 CP).
    • Create Item (Constructs), Corrupted for Reduced Cost / the created constructs have no will of their own, and are only useful when controlled by an outside spirit (4 CP).

Zebrican. All Zebras gain a their native language as a bonus language. If they’re raised somewhere else, or are never even exposed to it… they still speak it. Such is the word of Thoth (1 CP).

Survival: Zebras have some (rather basic) instinctive survival skills, and gain a +1 racial bonus to the Survival skill (1 CP).

If a Zebra happens to have either Speak Language or Survival as an Adept skill thanks to their racial bonus feat, these bonuses are, of course, doubled as usual.

Racial Disadvantage: Restrictions (Spellcasting). Zebras simply do not cast spells – although they may develop psionic abilities. This gains them +1 CP per Level to spend as they will.

At a total cost of +32 CP, Zebra are a +1 ECL species – and remain so when stacked with the basic Pony Template (which brings their total to 63 CP – the limit for a +1 ECL race).

The Zebra are quite formidable – and rather more versatile as a species than the individual pony subtypes – but their abilities are considerably more subtle. They’re also grimmer, far more inclined to kill or take severe actions against opponents, and see the use of dark powers, necromancy, and sending the dead walking around as being quite normal. Just as importantly, their lands support mercenaries, tomb raiders, exorcists and undead-slayers, crazed dark channelers, dungeons, plenty of noble intrigue,the creation of undead, and byzantine political struggles as a normal part of life. Just beyond the thin, magically-warded, strips of civilization there are vast expanses of deadly desert, terrible jungles, magical storms, lost cities and civilizations, and any number of deadly magical beasts.

Here, at least, there are plenty of places and jobs for adventurers.

The trouble with the Zebra – and the reason why they weren’t included in the original set of pony racial builds despite being obviously canon – is that My Little Pony only gives us one example. Worse, she is clearly both a long way from home and acting in a way that’s atypical for Zebras or she wouldn’t be the only one around. In d20 terms she’s a wandering (expatriate, questing, exiled, whatever) mystic, and almost certainly has a few levels.

So what do we see her do?

  • She lives by herself in a strange hut in a magical forest. She serves as a source of one-shot plot-device magical items when the story needs them. Unlike Celestia, she doesn’t have a lot of raw power, national influence, or other responsibilities, which lets her take the wise and mysterious mentor role while still limiting her impact on events. That also means that the writers keep whatever powers she may have subtle and ambiguous.
  • So we have intentionally subtle and ambiguous powers, an intentionally mysterious race, intentionally limited exposure, and an intentional complete lack of explanations. Vague to start with and with no way to sort out Zecora’s personal skills from whatever her racial talents might be.
  • And so Zebra didn’t make the original list of canon pony types because there just wasn’t enough information to go on. Still, this time the request was for what an upgrade to match the other Ponyfinder pony types might look like on Equus – and speculation works just fine for that.
  • Now for Zecora’s more specific tricks…
  • She’s good at herbalism, balancing, parazoology, and telling spooky stories. There may be a natural affinity there, but that sounds like skill levels or perhaps some specific knowledges.
  • She can create various magical potions, dusts, salves, oils, pills, incenses, and curatives from natural magical ingredients. The power level seems to depend on the components. Of course, the Cutie Mark Crusaders can make potions too. They just needed to have, and successfully follow, the appropriate recipe. On the other hoof… Zecora can do it quickly and knows all kinds of recipes and what various components can be used for.
  • She may be able to produce a cup full of water, but that could just be sleight of hoof – and at that point she DOES seem to be teaching Twilight about focus, misdirection, and trickery rather than training her in raw magical power.
  • She hides the Alicorn Amulet. Of course she might have hoofed it off to Celestia, buried it under a random rock somewhere in the forest, or given it to Gollum to replace his “Precious”. There’s no evidence of any special power here at all, even if this is evidence of Twilight having less than perfect judgement.
  • She lives safely in the Everfree Forest, apparently undisturbed. That coujld be survival skills, or pacts with the forest spirits, or using some kind of warding talisman or spell. Or it might just be a fairly safe area of the forest; after all, the Cutie Mark Crusaders are allowed to go and visit her on their own.
  • Her truth-revealing salve reveals that time has been altered (how often does THAT come up that she knows what that reaction means?). Still, that’s just alchemy again.
  • She has a lot of bling – jewelry, totemic masks, dreamcatchers, and other oddities. Her only real competition in that field is Twilight and her collection of mad-scientist machines. That probably isn’t really a power, but I have gratuitously made it into one as a possible bonus feat.

Ponyfinder gives all Zebra’s the Poison Use ability and a facility with languages. This time… I didn’t go with that except as possible bonus feats. Equestria really only seems to have one major language and is notably short on the use of poisons – and even if it WASN’T, a knack for using weapon poisons would really only be useful to adventurers. A racial talent that’s utterly useless to 99% or more of the race seems kind of weird.

 

Advertisements

Eclipse – Sample Races, Templates, and Characters Update

Here, at last, is an updated index to all the Eclipse-Style Races, Templates, Power Packages, and Sample Characters on the blog.I’m going to sticky this and try to keep it reasonably current from now on.

If you’re building a character, the usual sequence will be Race – Template (if any) – Basic Build, so that’s how this is organized. If you’re looking for “how-to” information, next up is the level-by-level class breakdowns and the general power-package information and examples. After that, for inspiration, swiping power packages from, and use in other games, comes the sample higher-level characters.

Character Creation and System Primer

Sample Races:

Sample Templates:

Eclipse Pathfinder:

Eclipse handles Pathfinder just fine – so here are Eclipse breakdowns for Pathfinder –Basics and Races and the class breakdowns for the  Alchemist, Barbarian, Bard, Cleric, Druid, FighterMonk, Paladin, Ranger, Rogue, Sorcerer and Summoner. The sample characters are pretty much all compatible with Pathfinder; if they don’t already have the Pathfinder Package Deal from Basics and Races simply add +2 to an attribute and +3 to their skills.

Sample Level One Character Builds:

Level-by-Level Class Breakdowns:

General Build Information and Power Packages:

Sample High-Level Characters:

. . Note that these characters were generally built for particular campaigns, and so are sometimes built using campaign-specific variants – usually a price break on especially-relevant abilities. These are covered in the Campaign Sheets for the relevant campaigns – Federation-Apocalypse Campaign, Ironwinds Campaign, Atheria Campaign, Twilight Isles Campaign, and Darkweird Campaign.

Level Two Sample Characters:

Level Three Sample Characters:

Level Four Sample Characters:

Level Five Sample Characters:

Level Six Sample Characters:

Level Seven Sample Characters:

Level Eight Sample Characters:

Higher Level Sample Characters:

Level Ten and Twenty Breakdowns:

Alzrius has also put up quite a few Eclipse characters on his Intelligence Check blog – including quite a few interpretations of popular characters from a variety of sources. Pretty much all of them are written up for Pathfinder, and usually use the Pathfinder Package Deal.

  • Rinoa, from Final Fantasy via Dead Fantasy, a powerful 15’th level spellcaster – along with the Hyne Witch template and a discussion of many of the other characters.
  • Pyrrha Nikos, a 7th-level Huntress-in-training, along with statistics for Vytal Humans, three Martial Arts, and some world background and discussion.
  • Sharalia, a Level One Fire Dancer – a character who controls flame through dance.
  • A 20’th level breakdown for an Antimage –  a “class” that specializes in negating the powers of dangerous spellcasters.
  • The Maedar – a racial template breakdown for a male medusa.
  • Sailor Saturn – a fragile young woman from the Sailor Moon anime with some exceptionally over-the-top powers.
  • Scorpion from Mortal Kombat, written up at the peak of his powers – along with the Netherrealm Ghost template and three Martial Arts.
  • Sam Winchester, a level three paranormal investigator from the Supernatural television series.
  • Varek, a Level Six Cleric with some support abilities.
  • Abraham Lincoln, Level Twelve Civil Warrior of the United States of America – with a touch of Vampire Hunter and including his Martial Art.
  • Agent Spin – a Second Level Elite Beat Agent who gets sent… to encourage people in trouble.
  • Gargamel, a First Level Incompetent Ritualist and Bumbler – perhaps fortunately, without statistics for Smurfs.
  • Spinnerette, a Level Five Spider-Style Superheroine/
  • Malecite, a Level Ten Villainous Mage from Suburban Knights, along with Malecite’s Hand, a vastly powerful relic and various new spells.
  • Dirk Markson, a Level One Dark Witch – and possible hero.
  • Barney Stinson (Scroll Down), a Level One Sitcom Inhabitant – from How I Met Your Mother.

Alzrius’s Eclipse d20 Ponies:

Alzrius built his ponies so as to fit into “standard” d20 games – whereas I used the “Superheroic” world template because it would allow my builds to reproduce the things that the ponies did on the show. Of course, that means that my builds will only work well in games based on the assumptions of Equestria; they won’t do so well in basic games. For those, courtesy of Alzrius, we have…

  • The Pony Races:  Earth Ponies, Pegasi, and Unicorns.
  • The Elements of Harmony:  Built as Eclipse Relics.
  • Rarity:  Starting off the series at level one! Commentary: Using the Elements of Harmony to cover the characters occasional incredible stunts.
  • Princess Celestia: As she generally appears on the show – as a ninth-level mentor-type who explains why she can’t handle things.
  • Adagio of the Sirens: Unreformed, still at large, and needing only an enchanted gem to make a comeback.
  • Lex Legis (And his Picture): Alzrius’s original character – and a very “gray” potential opponent.
  • Notes on Zecora: A discussion of just how much power – or lack thereof – is needed to build Zecora. Comments: My take on Zebras.
  • The Journal of the Two Sisters – and lapses in logic therein. Comments: Unicorn populations and birthrates, basic demographics – and why the “Unicorns losing their magic” story makes no sense in any terms.
  • Iliana, the Ponyfinder Queen: An examination of how to use Eclipse to customize – and slightly upgrade – a Ponyfinder queen to fit her history.
  • Lashtada, Ponyfinder Goddess:  As set up using The Primal Order for second edition.
  • Sonata Dusk: As appearing in his Fanfiction.
  • A Magical Medieval Society: Equestria: Building equestrian society using “A Magical Medieval Society”.
  • Baby Got Backlash: Flurry Heart and Magical Surges
  • Tempest Shadow: The movie antagonist escapes into d20, rather than remaining to face the friendship

Eclipsing Raven Trigonsdottir – Part II

For Part One – Raven’s general background and powers – click HERE.

So how do we convert Raven’s assorted appearances (and retconned histories and powers) into d20 statistics?

Well, obviously enough she’s going to be using the Superheroic World Template from Eclipse (and thus will be getting free Mana equal to her Con Mod to use to power her abilities (or to convert to Generic Spell Levels or Psionic Power) every round.

As a superhero, we’ll want the Four Color Template (24 CP).

Since I did the last set of heroes that way… she’ll be using the Pathfinder Package Deal (Free) and will be a Pathfinder Human (Free). I could justify a Racial Template easily enough, but the vast majority of the time she acts pretty human.

Next up, it’s attributes – and Raven always seemed to be a bit of a glass cannon when it came to her personal abilities. She…

  • Isn’t especially strong. She’s well exercised and in good shape, but she’s still a fairly petite young woman – and her few examples of “stronger than average” are mostly either when being demonic or could easily be telekinesis. Str 10.
  • She’s reasonably bright and well-read, but she’s no amazing genius even if she does evidently have a knack for languages. She had the entire DC universe to choose from less the Justice League – and she picked an assortment of teenagers including Robin, Beast Boy, and Cyborg to throw at a planetary menace? Int 14.
  • She’s reasonably perceptive too, but she has a terrible time controlling her own mind and is often in fairly massive denial about her own emotions, which doesn’t say all that much for her personal discipline, willpower, self-awareness, or sanity. Wis 14.
  • She’s energetic and healthy, but in superhero terms she’s a bit of a glass cannon, often collapsing due to feedback from her Soul-Self or when she’s actually hit. Con 14.
  • She’s reasonably agile, and is decent at getting out of the way – but she’s no fabulous acrobat. Dex 14.
  • She’s fairly attractive, and – for a half-demon sorceress likely to be the catalyst for global destruction – manages to be vulnerable and in need of hugs a lot, but she has an off-putting personality and had to resort to emotional manipulation to manage people. Still, she is a hero and usually gets along with her teammates well enough. Ergo, Cha 14

In Pathfinder point buy that has a net cost of… 25 points. Exactly what’s available for a high-end campaign. A perfect match!

So…

Raven (A.KA. “Rachel Roth”)

Level Eight Superheroic Witch / Harbinger Of Apocalypse

Four Color Template (24 CP).

Pathfinder Package Deal (Free)

Pathfinder Human (Free)

Basic Attributes: Str 10 (+2 Enh = 12), Int 14 (+2 Enh = 16), Wis 14 (+2 Enh = 16), Con 14 (+2 Enh +2 Human = 18), Dex 14 (+2 Enh = 16), and Cha 14 (+2 Enh +2 Level = 18).

When she goes all demonic her physical attributes increase to Str 16, Con 22, and Dex 20, see below.

Witchcraft:

Witchcraft: I, II, and III with The Secret Order (Order of Azarath), Specialized and Corrupted for Increased Effect (see individual power listings): all abilities are subject to at least seven limitations – as follows unless otherwise indicated. 24 Power, Save DC Will 21 (24 CP).

  • Her powers flare up uncontrollably when she loses control of her emotions.
  • Her powers leave her vulnerable to possession by Trigon or – if she becomes angry – by her own demonic nature. The GM may call for a will save, assigning the DC as appropriate, if this comes up.
  • Her powers fail entirely if she simply suppresses her emotions.
  • Her powers require incantations, and will either fail (d6: 1-2) or flare up randomly (d6: 3) if used without one.
  • Her powers become increasingly uncontrollable as time passes if she does not spend at least four hours per day in meditation and mystic ritual.
  • Other magicians will easily detect that she is filled with corrupting demonic energies.
  • Exercising fine control with her powers requires dexterity checks, as if she was fumbling with waldos.

Basic Witchcraft Abilities

  • Witchsight (No incantation, but a very limited set of automatic effects): Raven can sense magic and souls and see through both normal darkness and her own (but not other people’s) magical darkness.
  • The Hand of Shadows (Azarath Metrion Zinthos!): Triple Effect (Str 36, 48 when Evil). The items affected are usually covered in darkness but she’s also manifested tentacles of darkness extending from her to grab things with. (1 Power per Minute, 2 power for Animate Object, 1 power for three hours light work).
  • The Adamant Will (Azarath Mortix Metrion! Using it without an incantation usually results in weird mental struggles): Reduced Cost. Note that this will NOT work against “attacks” which trigger or target preexisting forces within her own mind, such as Trigon’s corruption or her own fears and insecurities.
  • Infliction (Necronom Hezberek Mortix!): Triple Effect (up to 9/15/21d4 for 1/2/3 Power, +3 power for 5′ radius, save for half), she is incapable of fine control, but does not risk possession by Trigon in using this power. It generally manifests as either Psychic Bolts (nonlethal damage) or various forms of telekinetic destruction.
  • Healing (Azarath Syrium Anmortrix!): Triple effect and does not provoke possession by Trigon, but causes pain and backlash. Each time it’s used roll a Will save at DC (18 + Number of Uses Today). On a failure take 3d6 damage and this ability burns out until tomorrow.
  • Shadowweave (Akon Wenthin Obrium!): She does not risk possession by Trigon in using this power, but can only create light based effects when she is purified of demonic energy. She can usually create long-lasting areas of darkness, wrap herself in shadows, change her appearance to some degree, or disguise her soul-self as her. No matter how she dresses she can look edgy and goth and no matter how she decorates her room it can always be dark, gloomy, and filled with mystic special effects. .
  • Glamour (Carazon Rakashas Cortis!): +6 CP for increased effects, Triple effect, this power does not provoke possession by Trigon or her personal evil, but is purely focused on emotional manipulations. Within that field she can generate effects of up to level nine.
  • The Inner Eye (Vaserix Enderin Azarath!): This ability provides only a limited range of effects, but does not have to be actively invoked to detect powerful emotions, mental effects, and invisible creatures. Active casting is required for reading thoughts and psychic impressions.
  • Dreamfaring: (Reduced Cost): Does not require an incantation, but does not allow the use of Dimensional Projection (although she can achieve similar results using her soul-self). Raven can send messages into people’s dreams and contact them there, hear and speak with those in adjacent dimensions while remaining merged with her soul-self and either Astral or Ethereal (thus making an excellent messenger and herald since she can appear to, and talk with, many very physically powerful entities with very little risk of harm), and can affect various sorts of immaterial spirits.

“Dark” Basic Witchcraft Abilities:

  • Hyloka (Triple Effect): While this ability requires no incantation, it is only usable while Raven is possessed by evil and normally focuses on a single effect – providing a +4 bonus on her Strength, Dexterity, and Constitution.
  • Elfshot (Trigon Hezberek Synthos!): Triple Effect. Dark Raven can infuse people with demonic energies, causing them to slowly transform into demons, to “incubate” demons, or to otherwise transform into creatures of evil. Apparently normal humans can only become lesser monsters, only “supers” can become actual demons. .
  • Witchfire (Triple Effect). While this requires no incantation, it can only be used while Raven is possessed by evil – in which case she can generate fire, lightning, toxic miasmas, and similar effects.

Additional Witchcraft Abilities:

  • Soul-Self (Birth of Flames, Increased Effect): Summoning her soul-self does not require an incantation and has no risk of causing possession by Trigon, but it may only be maintained externally for ten minutes or so, damage done to it beyond the 50% mark does similar amounts of nonlethal damage to her (6 CP),

The Soul-Self:

Huge Construct, 120 HP, Speed 50, AC 33 (+25 Natural -2 Size), 2 Slams at +28 for 2d6+18, Reach 15, Fort +6, Ref +6, Will +6, Abilities:

  • Class-A: Damage Reduction 10/Magic or Sonic, Fly III (60 Feet), Bonded
  • Class-B: Fast Healing (II), Feat (Improved Grab), Improved Buff (+15 HP), Sensory Link, Spell Storing (12 levels), and Warding
  • Class-C: Enveloping, Mass Enveloping (up to seven medium-sized creatures or a dozen small ones), Mindful, Incorporeal II (May become Astral or Ethereal at will), and Spell Resistance 24.

Raven’s Soul-Self is arguably her most potent power by a considerable margin, and is a match for many heroes all by itself.

  • Ashen Rebirth with Teleportation, only with her Soul-Self (and any passengers), Increased Effect: allows Plane and “Time” (functionally – since she never makes convenient short jumps or seems to alter the present – visiting alternate timelines which happen to be decades or centuries ahead or behind her home timeline) Shifts. She usually arrives at “weak points” – gates, moments of crisis, and so on (12 CP).
  • Plus 4d6 Mana at Triple Effect (as 36d6 or 126 Power), only for Witchcraft basic limits as above (24 CP).
    • This is actually quite a lot of power given that Witchcraft tends to be quite power-efficient – and so will allow Raven to function quite effectively for some time even without the Superheroic World Template to provide free mana.
  • Witchcraft Pacts: Rituals (Meditation), Possession, Duties, and Missions (-24 CP).

Other Mystical Abilities:

  • Extraordinary Returning (12 CP). Raven must be slain and her soul forcibly taken into the higher afterlives for her to truly die.
  • Immunity (Space-Time Disturbances. Uncommon, Major, Great). Raven is immune, or at least highly resistant, to most temporal changes and paradoxes, to the warping and disorienting effects of dimensional shifts and changes, and to similar events. (Not that this normally comes up). Specialized/the effects are erratic when they do come into play (6 CP).
    • This also appears to be an ability that she acquired thanks to some dimensional shifting and revisionist history that led her to remember the original timeline where she supposedly didn’t have such a power but apparently used it to protect herself and the other Titans from Trigon’s reality-twisting. It probably won’t apply again the next time there’s a retcon that it ought to protect her from. Don’t think about that too hard; I’m certainly not going to.
  • Blessing with the “Group” modifier, Corrupted for Increased Effect (increased number of targets which may include the user) and Specialized for Reduced Cost (6 CP), only to share the benefits of her mental defenses and immunity to space-time disturbances with her friends and allies.
  • Occult Ritual (6 CP). Raven is capable of performing various magical rituals, provided that she can gather the components and make the necessary rolls. She rarely uses this ability, but she does have it.
  • Innate Enchantment (In general, Spell Level Zero or One, Caster Level One, Unlimited-Use Use-Activated (x2000 GP), Personal-Only where Relevant (x.7). 11,000 GP net value (12 CP).
    • Enhance Attribute: +2 Enhancement Bonus to each Attribute (8400 GP). There really isn’t any good justification for this, but it’s not like ability scores of “16″ are particularly over the top for a superhero. I’m putting it in in token of her considerable experience.
    • Updraft: This covers her limited ability to float around, 2000 GP.
    • Skill Mastery: +2 Competence Bonus to Int-Based Skills, 700 GP.

Skills:

  • Skill Boosters: Upgrade Human Fast Learner to +2 SP/Level (3 CP), Fast Learner, Specialized in Skills for +2 SP/Level (6 CP), Adept (Expertise/Arcane Lore, Expertise/Theology & Philosophy, Expertise/The Planes, and Intimidation, 6 CP).
  • Available Skill Points: 33 (Int Mod x 11) + 44 (Fast Learners) = 77 SP
  • Purchased Skills:
    • Deception: +7 (7 SP) +3 (Cha) = +10
    • Expertise (Arcane Lore): +11 (5* SP) +2 (Comp) +3 (Int) = +16
    • Expertise (Theology & Philosophy): +11 (5* SP) +2 (Comp) +3 (Int) = +16
    • Expertise (The Planes): +11 (5* SP) +2 (Comp) +3 (Int) = +16
    • Insight +7 (7 SP) +3 (Wis) = +10
    • Intimidation: +11 (5* SP) +3 (Cha) = +14
    • Martial Art (Aikido) +11 (11 SP) +3 (Dex) = +14
    • Perception+7 (7 SP) +3 (Wis) = +10
    • Persuasion +7 (7 SP) +3 (Cha) = +10
  • Languages: 7 (7 SP) +3 (Int) +Azarathan (Native) +Common (English, Free) = 12 Languages. Abyssal, Azarathan (also known as Celestial), Draconic, English, German, Greek, Latin, Mandarin, Romanian, Sanskrit, Sumerian, and Sylvan.
  • Martial Arts (Aikido) Techniques Know: Defenses 4, Strike, Mind Like Moon, and Improved Trip. Not too surprisingly, Raven’s martial arts skills primarily focus on avoiding attacks, although she does know some basic locks and throws.

This leaves her with 11 skill points – enough for one more maxed-out skill. A magical martial art might be in order, but there’s not a lot of justification for one. I’ll leave those points to the reader to spend since I’m not really familiar with the more recent versions of the character.

Minor Abilities:

  • Telekinetic Deflection: Advanced Improved Augmented Bonus: Adds (Cha Mod) to (Dex Mod) when determining AC, Specialized/not cumulative with physical armor (9 CP).
  • Immunity / Equipment Loss (Uncommon, Major, Legendary, Corrupted / special plotlines or deliberate attempts to separate her from her equipment may succeed for brief periods, but she always gets her stuff back shortly, Specialized / only protects her appropriate wealth by level (12 CP).
  • Minor Privilege (3 CP): As a trained mystic from a magical dimension, Raven can get “normal” magical items for equipment.
  • Double Enthusiast, Specialized for Increased Effect (four “floating” CP) and Corrupted for Reduced Cost: only to be invested in Relics (4 CP).
  • Create Relic, Specialized and Corrupted / the GM decides what relics she gains and when they are active, all of them have potential downsides. Thus, for example, a mirror offering her great meditative benefits and easier emotional control can accidently pull others into her mind, a book with a spirit that teaches more magic may actually turn out to be an entrapped monster, and so on (2 CP).
  • Major Privilege: Sponsored superhero with some legal authority and the right to request official assistance in various matters (6 CP).
  • Major Favors: Teen Titans, Justice League, various other heroic groups (6 CP).
  • Major Privilege: Wealth. Raven never needs to worry about her personal funds and is treated as one level higher when calculating her wealth-by-level (6 CP)
  • Reflex Training (Extra Actions Variant) with +3 Bonus Uses (6/Day total), Specialized / only to either evade an attack or for her (or her soul-self) to get in the way of an attack (5 CP).

Basics:

  • BAB: +6, Corrupted/does not contribute to iterative attacks (24 CP). This is primarily used for telekinetic assaults.
  • Hit Dice: 8 (L1d8, 4 CP) +26 (L2-8d6, 14 CP) +12 (Immortal Vigor) +40 (Con Mod x 10) = 86 HP
  • Saving Throws:
    • Fortitude +3 (9 CP) +4 (Con) +3 (Res) = +10
    • Reflex +4 (12 CP) +3 (Dex) +3 (Res) = +10
    • Will +6 (18 CP) +3 (Wis) +3 (Res) = +12
      • Luck would be more efficient – but if there’s one thing that the comics have established, it’s that Raven has no luck.
  • Proficiencies: All Simple Weapons (3 CP).
  • Armor Class: 10 (Base) +3 (Dex Mod) +3 (Armor) +4 (Martial Art) +4 (Cha Mod) +2 Deflection = 26

Point Costs:

  • Four Color Template: 24 CP
  • Witchcraft: 48 CP (Plus Pacts)
  • Other Mystical Abilities: 42 CP
  • Skill Boosters: 15 CP
  • Purchased Skills: 0 CP
  • Minor Abilities: 53 CP
  • Base Attack Bonus: 24 CP
  • Hit Dice: 18 CP
  • Saving Throws: 39 CP
  • Proficiencies: 3 CP

That’s 266 CP

Available Character Points: 216 (Level Eight Base) +10 (Disadvantages: History, Pacifistic, and Hunted (demons and entities who want to use her for various things), + 16 (Duties to Azar and to Oppose Trigon) +30 (Human, L1, L3, L5, and L7 Bonus Feats) = 272 CP

That leaves 6 CP – enough for one bonus feat, another special Witchcraft ability, an extra +2 on a save, or some other minor benefit. I’m going to leave that open simply because – as I’ve already noted – I’m not really that familiar with recent versions of the character. Ergo, we have a bit of wiggle room to add whatever I’ve left out.

If nothing else comes to mind, put it in Power Words (Specialized in storing Ritual Effects only) and figure that she can prepare the occasional specialty magical effect (such as putting a dragon back into a cursed tome) in advance.

Remaining Details:

  • Minor Four-Color Ability: Immortal Vigor I. Everybody can always use a few more hit points.
  • Equipment: 46,000 GP: Cloak of Resistance +3 (9000 GP), Bracers of Armor +3 (9000 GP), Ring of Feather Falling (2200 GP), Ring of Protection +2 (8000 GP), Gauntlets of Ghost Fighting (4000 GP), Greater (Armor) Crystal Of Adaption (3000 GP), Amulet of Tears (2300 GP), Raptor’s Mask (3500 GP), Occult Library (As per a Mask Of A Thousand Tomes, but basically immobile (x.5) and at least 1d4 hours of intense study and concentration in a suitable study room to use (x.8) = 4000 GP), Hero Team Comlink (Satellite Smartphone with HUD and hands-free links, 250 GP), and an Advanced First Aid Kit / Healing Belt (750 GP). (No, Raven is never shown with a first aid kit that I know of. Yes, it would be INCREDIBLY stupid not to have one. I say that she does).

Raven is exceptionally versatile and – as a fast transdimensional teleporter with defensive Reflex Actions, a powerful summons she can send on missions, immunity to timeline manipulation, the ability to routinely return from death, intangibility, and whatever occult relic the game master feels like giving her – is virtually impossible to get rid of for long. On the offensive side she has powerful telekinesis, receptive and projective empathy, and formidable mystic bolts to play with when she needs speed and ritual magic when she doesn’t – even before delving into her minor powers. That’s a LOT of durability and options.

If she wasn’t generally a pacifist she could be doing an awful lot of damage – and would be potentially story-breaking in a wide variety of ways.

Oh, as for that Death Battle with Twilight Sparkle?

Well, discounting Twilights Meta-Powers (recovers from any effect that would be upsetting to a small girl if it happened to a favorite pet before said small girl would have time to get seriously upset, her presence (or that of any other major My Little Pony character) causes all situations to be quickly resolved in a cheerful happy ending for all the nice creatures and a comeuppance for all the naughty ones, friendship is the greatest power in the universe) to at least some extent, disregarding that they’re both “fight-only-if-necessary” types, that they’re actually mirror images in a lot of ways, and the fact that Raven is really fond of “Pretty, Pretty, Pegasus” (the in-universe version of My Little Pony) and that they BOTH started their careers by gathering a group of friends to defeat a great evil…

If they did fight – which would take a LOT of contriving – I’d probably have to give it to Raven. Sure, she’s died a lot – but Raven actually knows how to fight while Twilight is honestly really, really, REALLY bad at it. Secondarily, Raven has her soul-self ally to grab Twilight from behind while Raven keeps her busy from the front.

I would also expect Raven to then punch Death in the jaw (he IS one of her relatives after all), for Twilight to pop up again after a few seconds (after just long enough of a “death” for the match to end), and for the happy tea party with Fluttershy and many small furry things to be in full swing within five minutes. This isn’t QUITE like asking a couple of Bodhisattvas to meditate each other to death, but it’s not that far from it either.

Eclipsing Raven Trigonsdottir – Part I

There are quite a few requests that I’d like to make; the hard part is figuring out which of them I’d like to see the most. That said, there’s one that does spring to mind: in honor of her fighting Twilight Sparkle in the next Death Battle, I’m curious to see what DC Comics’ Raven would look like with Eclipse stats.

-Alzrius

Well, why not?

OK. It’s Raven, Daughter of Trigon, mystically trained by the pacifistic (also intolerant, self-righteous, arrogant, and quite often downright stupid) mystical followers of Azar in their private pocket dimension, That gave her a whole raft of abilities, made her extremely powerful, and turned her into a psychological basket case. She mostly hangs out with the Teen Titans when she isn’t being a demonic emissary of her father, or being a ghost, or being controlled by someone .

That kind of thing actually happens to her a LOT – probably for the same reason that Wolverine gets wounded a lot; you can’t show off Wolverine’s regenerative powers if he actually fights well enough to avoid being wounded and you can’t show off Raven’s ability to overcome her dark heritage and/or negative emotions unless she gets influenced by them. Ergo, the one with years of training in overcoming dark powers and controlling her emotions is the one who constantly falls to such things. That’s comic books for you!

Anyway, she’s pretty notorious for being a “roll a d6 at the start of the story” character:

  1. She’s a fabulously powerful asset to the team today, even if she IS a sarcastic snarker! You will wonder why anyone else is needed!
  2. She must greatly restrain her powers today, lest horrors be unleashed! Everyone else gets to do stuff!
  3. She brings dark tidings and will be crippled with struggles against her own inner demons today!
  4. She needs psychological support, and has likely created some mystical problem that will provide today’s narrative conflict, but will probably eventually do something useful if she gets enough hugs!
  5. She’s being pursued by Horrors From Beyond (TM!) today, and you must defend her even if magical horrors are in no way your field!
  6. She’s on Time Share with the Dark Forces today! You will have to find a way to stop her eldritch rampage or free her from their malevolent influence!

OK, that’s a bit of an exaggeration – it should probably be a d8 with the first couple of entries getting two numbers each – but it’s not that much of one. Raven really does fairly often go into NPC friendly enemy mode. Still, she’s one of the Titan’s, and is presumably worth putting up with (if only because peers with superpowers are scarce). It’s not like superpowered teenagers aren’t usually incredible pains in the ass anyway. NORMAL teenagers are bad enough about that.

Of course, a solid chunk of Raven’s plotlines and personal struggles revolve around her father Trigon – so you can’t really talk about Raven without talking about her father.

Trigon the Terrible. A dark god filled with the cast-of evil energies of the people of Azarath. At birth he killed everyone nearby, including his mother. At the age of six, he destroyed an entire planet. And by the age of thirty, he held dominion over millions of worlds in his dimension.

Hm… “Held Dominion”. “Millions”, and “Age Thirty”. So… in twenty-four years he conquered millions of worlds. Call it the minimum of two million. That gives him… six minutes and eighteen seconds per world in which to defeat all their heroes, conquer them, rule over them, and gloat, before departing, never to return – and that’s presuming that he never eats or rests or does anything else and takes no time to travel. He could be multitasking, but if he could do that… why didn’t he ever do it when he was fighting heroes? And didn’t he spend a fair amount of time on things like fathering children, gloating over his dominions, and scheming to conquer other planets? He certainly wasted rather a lot of time on Earth.

OK, he could be a more conventional warlord, and have “conquered” a lot of places by sending out minions and taking over political centers without ever getting near them, and be inflicting demonic misery across the galaxy by establishing a repressive bureaucracy enforcing obnoxious policies – but Trigon was never presented that way. The image was always of Trigon standing in the semi-ruins of a conquered city. gloating over it’s fallen defenders, not Emperor Palpatine contemplating Endor and considering whether to impose complicated income tax forms on the Ewoks to make them help pay for an extra Death Star.

Why Earth anyway? Wouldn’t his own dimension still contain an infinite number of worlds to conquer, some of them basically identical to Earth? Or is jumping dimensions easier than getting to other galaxies?

It’s a common writers failing, whether you call it “cannot do math” or “no sense of scale”. Entire planets and dimensions are written as if they consist of a couple of locations and a single environment and large numbers get thrown around with no thought for the consequences. In an Earth-style universe… to the best of our current understanding it’s infinite. As in an infinite number of identical copies of every possible variation. If there are two or more independent (as in “not connected to or seeking each other”) unique beings, effects, or sets of being in the multiverse the odds of two of them ever appearing in the same galaxy – even not at the same time – are literally zero. Is a devourer of universes so mighty and irresistible that it can attack everywhere in an infinite universe at the same time and only one galaxy in a hundred billion can hold out against utter annihilation for a single second? That means that there are an infinite number of holdouts. And there will be the same infinite number holding out against the next assault. and the next, and all the assaults after that. For equally infinite time. Infinity hasn’t got an end to reach.

If there are an infinite number of dimensions out there, then there are an infinite number of cosmically powerful entities out to conquer or destroy the multiverse and there always have been. It’s still here. Therefore attempts to destroy it either cannot work or it just comes back.

It doesn’t really help that the DC Hierarchy is pretty well defined. The Presence, Lucifer, the Archangels, and various others are all well above Trigon. And several of them hang around Earth a lot. Why did Trigon make such a point of invading one of the few places in the entire multiverse where he was guaranteed to get tossed out on his ear if the local great powers took him seriously? Could it be that he knew that those entities didn’t really care? Why not?

If a creature is a threat to even a single galaxy, wouldn’t every major hero who could detect it and reach the site show up to stop it? Even if that’s only a few per world… that would be billions or trillions of major heroes – plus similar or greater numbers of villains who didn’t want to be squashed with their worlds.

Yet that didn’t happen. Ergo… Trigon may be a personal threat to the solar system, or even a few solar systems, and to little one-city pocket dimensions like Azarath – but not to more than that.

Raven’s spirit – filled with the sacred inner light of a city full of pacifistic holy mystics – drove Trigon back or destroyed him (depending on continuity). Of course, to be fair… as a demonic figure made up of those same mystics cast-off darknesses, he was probably especially vulnerable to them even over and above the usual demonic weakness to sacred energies. Still, while Trigon had been “draining the souls” of conquered planets (whatever that was supposed to mean) even millions of them apparently didn’t give him enough power to stand up to one city worth of pacifistic mystics.

Personally, I’d build Trigon with Mystic Artist (Performance Art) with the ability to make himself seen and heard across immense areas and giving him the personal pocket dimension and environmental transformation effects – thus allowing him to twist a planet into a demonic hellscape and to be immune to almost all the heroes who didn’t wind up in his personal pocket realm. Then, if and when he is defeated… the changes he has made will quietly go away.

That also explains why he’s big on announcements, foreshadowing, overdramatics, hamming it up, making speeches, failing to kill his opponents, and going to new planets all the time. What’s performance art without new audiences? And dead audiences are of no use at ALL.

So Raven’s occasional reports of “Vast Power” can go into the same bin as Trigon’s; they’re basically illusory plot devices. I’d have doubts anyway given that most of the creatures crediting her OR Trigon with such powers had pretty clear agendas.

Next up, we ignore plot device Raven. That includes…

  • Possessed-By-Evil Raven and her ability to time stop the Justice League and contain her friends.
  • Channeling-The-Souls-Of-Azarath Raven and her ability to destroy Trigon.
  • Backed-By-Xavier Raven and her ability to blast a partial copy of Dark Pheonix created by Darkseid from negative emotions that HAD no positive emotions with love. (Said copy then got upset with Darkseid for doing such a half-assed job on the resurrection. Upshot; Darkseid permanently destroyed. If it wasn’t obvious enough, non-canon. And hardly the most absurd thing that happened in that particular crossover).
  • Golden Spirit Raven and her ability to transverse space, survive without a body, and apparently fade away into the afterlife.
  • Brother-Blood-Boosted Raven and her ability to break everyone free of his control machine.
  • New-52 Touched-By-Trigon Raven and her semi-omniscient ability to show up and mess with everyone the plot requires her to (Must… resist… “Bad Touch” jokes…).
  • And all the other variations on Turbocharged-By-External-Power-Sources Raven – as well as Informed-That-She-Could-Snuff-Out-Universes Raven (since it was by a demon with an ulterior motive – and those are notoriously untrustworthy anyway).

That leaves us with the stuff that she actually normally does. To compile a list…

  • Raven is a powerful empath, able to sense, project, and drain emotions. In at least some sources this also lets her project stunning mental blasts.
  • She can heal people, but it’s a strain and she’s pretty limited in how much she can heal. That’s pretty standard for heroes: being able to heal everyone messes up a LOT of dramatic scenes and plotlines amd opens up the question of why you aren’t spending your time on a hospital assembly line healing a steady stream of dying children and leaving the adventuring to characters with less miraculous powers.
  • She can call forth a formidable psychic construct she calls her soul-self, although the duration is somewhat limited. It can hold things, fly, wrap itself around people to protect them, and withstand a lot of damage, but if it’s disrupted there’s a substantial backlash against her and it takes some time to get it out again (I seem to recall that getting it out too soon leaves it weakened, but it’s been a long time). She is usually aware of what her soul-self could see and hear. I can’t recall it ever being shown to taste, smell, or feel much though. It is often portrayed passing through things (and possibly acting as an astral form), so it may be selectively insubstantial.
  • She can envelop people or groups in her soul-self and teleport them across space (it’s unclear as to how far, but it’s apparently not interplanetary), dimensions (at least to a limited set of mystic ones, sometimes using minor rituals, and with only partial control of her point of arrival), and time (well, during a special time of crisis anyway, and only to appear in quasi-historical and possible future settings. She never – say – drops back an hour to see who committed a crime. Her actions in the past never seem to change the present either, so this might be best represented as another subset of alternate dimensions). As a side effect she might or might not be resistant to disruptions in the timeline.
    • Overall, Raven’s soul-self is one of her most potent abilities – capable of restraining even truly major enemies at least briefly.
  • She has good mental defenses, but they’re not a lot of use against her own inner nature. Against general mental control they are, however, almost impregnable.
  • In the 2003-2006 television series she was a powerful telekinetic with a “dark force” power signature, presumably because it was a lot more visually dramatic than empathy – and so telekinesis has leaked into later depictions. She can throw things around, animate objects, and project a variety of telekinetic blasts.
  • She dies a lot and keeps coming back. Comics are notorious for the revolving door of life and death, but Raven sometimes seems to spin it fast enough to run a generator.
  • She often appears wrapped in shadows, her room is sometimes filled with darkness, and so on. This mostly seems to be special effects, but it’s ambiguous enough to count “turning off the lights” amongst her talents. She might be able to generate simple illusions – or at least make her soul-self look like her.
  • She might be able to sense souls or mystical energies and is apparently good at sensing minds. That’s pretty basic for semi-demonic psychic / magical types, but is pretty ambiguous in the source material.
  • She can imbue other people with some of her power. That’s usually a plot device power, but it’s worth mentioning since it’s a classic demonic ability.
  • She has undefined access to various magical spells, although most of them appear to be demonic (and only used when she’s evil) and she doesn’t often use anything but preset rituals.
  • She can variously levitate while meditating, fly using her soul-self, fly using dark telekinetic disks (or perhaps by just standing on her malleable soul-self), or just hover dramatically without explanation. On the other hand, she’s also known for being knocked out of the air.
  • She speaks English, German, Latin, Romanian, Ancient Sumerian, and Sanskrit (along, presumably, with Azarathan). That may not be a superhuman power, but it’s not easy either.
  • She had prophetic dreams about Trigon, but that might just be because she was going to become his gateway into Earth’s dimension and was deeply linked to him and the subject of prophecies that she knew about. She’s never really shown any general precognition. This probably isn’t really a power.

On the other hand… her powers run wild when she loses control of her emotions, will not work if she is afraid and unwilling to admit it, leave her vulnerable to possession by Trigon or her own demonic nature if she gets too angry, are erratic at best (at least in some depictions) if she can’t incant (usually, but not always, “Azarath… Metrion… Zinthos!”), call for spending a LOT of her time in meditation, cause many good magicians to consider her inherently corrupt, and isn’t especially good at fine control.

To be blunt… Raven is a good character, a great plot catalyst, and brings a lot of deep background and heroic struggle into a comic. She’s a LOUSY player character though. She’s often out of play while being evil and places the game master in the position of having to decide when she’s going to be suddenly crippled, leaving the player bored, or when she’s going to be able to use her vast array of powers freely – usually overshadowing the rest of her team. That really does not make for a good gaming experience. Still, she makes a fine NPC.

So next time on Raven… it will be converting her into d20 statistics.

D20 Terminators

And for today, it’s a question:

I admit I’m curious about Apocalypse after you mentioned him in your write-up for Cable, but really…while I know you meant with regards to the New Mutants (or similar groups), reading these over has reminded me of another action series that started in the 80’s and is still going today: The Terminator. While not quite the same, it deals with a lot of the subjects (killer robots, time travel, and advanced weaponry), so it strikes me as being in the same vein. More specifically, I’d love to see your take on the following:

  • The T-800 (and the T-850 variant),
  • The T-1000
  • The T-X
  • The T-3000

I think those would be a lot of fun.

-Alzrius

Well, why not? There’s already a fairly good book on this topic on the net, but – of course – it’s not as if I agree with everything in it.

Thanks to an incredibly tangled mess of alternate timelines, there are dozens of different “Terminators”, many of them mutually exclusive – and the movies aren’t too consistent about which ones are better or what they can do. That actually isn’t the big problem. Converting the Terminators to d20 is awkward for one major reason:

Terminators are designed to deal with reasonably realistic normal humans using personal weapons. In d20 terms that’s basically NPC classes and – at the top end – second level Fighters and Rogues with small arms.

For example, the classic T-800 is highly resistant to small arms. (generally up to 2d8). Only a lucky shot that hits a joint or exposed component was likely to do any actual damage. Yet small arms fire could take one down. It just took a LOT – or rather less armor-piercing stuff. And they certianly weren’t hard to hit, which let out armor class.

They seemed to be fairly resistant to energy too. The T-800 was able to handle lots and lots of being on fire (generally 1d6 to 3d6) but was unable to handle molten metal or magma (up to 20d6 on immersion).

Yet a pipe bomb (4d6 if you’re being generous) blew one in half. Admittedly that didn’t stop it, but it would be pretty hard to deny that eliminating the lower half is – by definition – probably about 50% damage. Even if we assume that Kyle Reese had some bonuses against Terminators (he can’t have too much though, since his small arms don’t work; perhaps about +1d6 with small arms, +2d6 with explosives?), that he got a good roll, and that the thing already had a little actual damage on it (as opposed to its disguise being ruined)… a Terminator can’t have more than twenty-five to thirty-five hit points. After all, we also know that anti-tank weapons – 8d6 to 10d6 – can damage them easily, and a solid hit (a good damage roll) can take them out in a single shot.

So, since we’re looking at Constructs here… we’re looking at Hardness of between 8 and 12. The standard for “Metal” is 10, so we’;; go with that.

Strength? Well… t-800 variants have been shown bracing a bus to keep it from falling off a bridge, stopping some enormous blast doors from closing, smashing down a large security door, punching through sheet metal, and smashing through cinder block walls.

Still… vehicles can hang partially over drops on their own, so that doesn’t tell us much. The blast doors… well, they were much bigger than the crusher which eliminated the first T-800. So why didn’t they crush the T-800? Perhaps they worked like elevator doors and stopped when firm resistance was registered? The shot didn’t seem to be show any strain or anything.

The large door… came down in one piece and wasn’t much damaged. Evidently the hinges broke. So that’s “break down strong door” (DC 23). Punching through sheet metal… I can poke an awl through sheet metal and hailstones can dent the sheet metal of my car. Sheet metal is simply not a major obstacle to something made of metal. Really, the cinder block walls are probably the most impressive item on this list.

d20 Modern (lifting from the fantasy SRD) lists the “burst” DC for a Cinder block Wall as 35 (Hardness 8, HP 90) – but that’s the same as a one-foot thick masonry wall and that, to put it bluntly, is baloney; I’ve worked with cinder blocks. Once we subtract the hollow part… Hardness 4, HP 20, and a burst DC of 24 is more like it. It might be less; I’ve had cinder blocks break when dropped a couple of feet.

The first movie didn’t show the Terminators as being especially good marksmen, or very stealthy, or extremely clever, or even all that fast. They WERE decent shots (especially when shooting unprotected people at point blank range while they were standing still – or when using a minigun to hose down parked cars with a stream of lead), had basic human level intelligence, were somewhat faster and considerably stronger than a normal human, were capable of using humanities clever machines against us, and they were very, very, determined.

Humans are Persistence Hunters. And the Terminators… are better at it. Plus, they were walking skeletons, classical images of death. They were humans plus, and they were bringing the same kind of death to humanity that humanity had brought to everything that stood in its way. They were stronger, and better adapted to humanities ecological niche, and they wanted us dead. They tapped into the same kind of fear that Godzilla – an avatar of natures uncontrollable wrath and atomic devastation – did.

S0… at a quick approximation: Medium Sized (which goes up to eight feet tall and 500 Lbs), Hardness 10, 30 HP, AC 15, Move 30, Darkvision and Low-Light Vision, Construct, BAB of somewhere between +1 and +4, basic Intelligence. can be temporarily “stunned” by damage. Str 20, considered “Large” for purposes of encumbrance, breaking things, and grappling. Dex 14 (they’re fairly fast and accurate, but they are not Jackie Chan), Int 10 (effectively anyway), Wis… had to say, but likely low, Con — (Construct), and Chr… probably 1 – although those that go rogue and develop personalities of some sort get normal rolls.

We can add a bunch of minor boosts and systems, but that’s our basic T-800 Framework – and the T-800 is a mainstay of the entire franchise.

The quick way to convert a Terminator into Eclipse is not to bother: Pathfinders standard Robot, Machine Soldier is pretty much an exact match (and may well have been meant to be). A T-800 has just been fitted with a high-quality disguise, has access to better weapons, and varies its tactics more.

And that’s a problem, because – while that’s capable of wading through first level Aristocrats, Experts, and Warriors (and even Fighters and Rogues) by the swarm – we want them to be formidable opponents. And many specialized or higher-level d20 characters are quite capable of taking and inflicting a lot more damage than that. It’s downright embarrassing when a mid-level barbarian takes a Terminators heavy weapons shot to the chest and shrugs it off before cutting the thing in half with his axe.

If you want to get sophisticated… drop the Machine Soldiers Two-Weapon Fighting and Weapon focus feats in favor of 12 CP worth of Innate Enchantment and start adding functions in search of 11,000 GP. As a partial Eclipse adaption, it’s probably best to upgrade the CR to 5.

  • Advanced Military Programming: +3 Competence Bonus to Heal, Intimidate, Perception, and Knowledge (History, the Military and Weapons in particular) (1400 GP).
  • Armored Framework: Enhance Structure: +12 + 2 x Str Mod Temporary HP to a construct, x.5 (only to a Construct, only to remain repairable after being reduced to 0 HP (700 GP).
  • Emergency Power: Enhance Attribute: +2 Enhancement Bonus to Strength (1400 GP).
  • Enhanced Servomotors: Boost Armor: Reduced Defense VII (+0 AC, -14 DC), Segmented III (+6 DC, no non-proficiency penalty), Max Dex +4 (-), Speed +10, +4 Str, +2 Reflex Saves (Net purchase DC 10 = 120 Credits or 6 GP). (This is a very cheap trick, but so be it).
  • Hyperalloy Endoskeleton: Crystal of Adamant Armor, Least (+2 Hardness) (300 GP). This increases the units hardness to 12.
  • Iron Strike: The user’s hands are treated as +2 Hand Axes (1400 GP).
  • Large and Heavy: Enlarge Person: Only to be considered Large for the purpose of breaking doors and other objects, grappling, and carrying things (x.5) (700 GP).
  • Reroute Systems: Repair Light Damage (3 uses x .6, recovers only when refurbished x.4, Self-Only x.7, requires 1d6 rounds to trigger after being reduced to 0 HP (ignoring Enhance Structure) x.5, if the first use is insufficient to get the unit up, further uses must be externally triggered by attempts at repair or an application of Mimetic Polyalloy (168 GP).
  • Self-Repair: Repair Light Damage (3 uses x .6, recovers only when refurbished x.4, Self-Only x.7, requires at least one minute of work (x.5) (168 GP).
  • Targeting System: +2 to BAB with Small Arms (1400 GP).
  • Weapons Catalog: Masters Touch, x.7 Weapons Only (1400 GP).
  • Secondary Equipment: Advanced Smartphone (10 GP), GPS (20 GP), Radio Scanner (10 GP), Lock Release Gun (10 GP), Rangefinding Binoculars (25 GP), Compass (2 CP), Flash Goggles (25 GP), HUD (3 GP), Military Transceiver (20 GP), Vocalizer (Voice Imitation, 50 GP), Power Backpack (5 GP), Multipurpose Tool (4 GP), and Remote Surveillance Module (20 GP). Net total: 200 GP.

That’s a total of 9250 GP worth of Innate Enchantment. It’s also significantly stronger and tougher than is really justified for a T-800 – but that’s all right given that quite a few of the variant models are supposed to be slightly stronger, or faster, or otherwise better – although there’s rarely any actual evidence of this. It also leaves 1750 GP worth of innate enchantment (up to 2250 GP if taking advantage of rounding) to add model details.

T-600:

  • The earliest “humanoid” Terminator, the major point of this model was to go into all the places that humans could – wading through water, crawling though holes and pipes, and otherwise getting into their hiding places. It had Tracking (even if it wasn’t all that good at it) instead of one of the Innate Enchantment feats, and so only has 5000 GP worth of boosts. Unfortunately, there really isn’t much information as to what – so you’ll just have to pick your own package.

T-700:

  • This model was apparently an experimental one, and is a bit less durable than the T-800. It has no Hyperalloy Endoskeleton, and so only has Hardness 10. It may have other limitations as well (possibly including the T-600’s tracking feat instead of other benefits), but there’s not a lot of information on them. It was often outfitted with good, but nowhere near perfect, disguises.

T-720:

  • This upgraded T-700 simply has heavier armor. To represent this, upgrade the Enhanced Servomotors entry to actually provide an armor bonus (variable cost) and – presumably – add some built-in weapons. As such, it cannot be effectively disguised. Unfortunately, it’s far more practical to simply deploy armed drones if you can’t disguise your units anyway, so T-720’s are rare, having mostly been upgraded from surviving T-700’s.

T-799:

  • These are basically identical to the T-800, but – not yet being standardized – were more expensive. Few were produced.

T-800:

  • For game purposes this is the basic model. Interestingly, quite a number of “rogue” T-800 units have added various upgrades to themselves – presumably making use of that 1750 GP worth of additional allowable improvements. If nothing else comes to mind… give them a +1 Resistance Bonus to Saving Throws (700 GP) and an Internal Inertial Compass that always lets them know True North (700 GP).

T-850:

  • Add Data Archive (+4 to all Knowledge Skills, all skills are treated as class skills, 750 GP).
  • Upgrade Armor Crystal to a Lesser Version (+5 Hardness, for a total of 15, 1000 GP).
  • Add Morphic Disguise Kit (10 GP). With an extra +6 bonus – and Taking 20 – a T-850 can slowly repair / regrow its human disguise.

T-888

  • Add Expeditious Retreat (1400 GP).
  • A +3 Bonus to Disguise (Thanks to a knowledge of human psychology, 700 GP).
  • Add Built-in Katanas (20 GP).
  • Another 30 GP worth of weapons is likely, but never demonstrated.

The T-900 and T-950 are supposed to be improved somehow, but seemed notably inferior to the 850 models in actual combat. I’d presume that while they are, in fact, somewhat inferior, they are also more stable and far less expensive to produce – a very worthwhile upgrade indeed during wartime, but not something that costs points.

T-X

  • Add Built-In Weaponry: Plasma Rifle (75 GP), Flamethrower (45 GP), Twin Thunder Machine Gun (175 GP), High Frequency Sword (25 GP), Grenade Launcher (100 GP), Laser Sniper Rifle (140 GP), Taser (3 GP), Katana (10 GP), Chain Saw (12.5 GP), minor melee weapons, for a net total of 600 GP.
  • Add Holodisguise (25 GP), since a T-X can perform minor modifications, but cannot change its basic internal structure.
  • Add a Wireless “Neural” Jack (20 GP) and a Neural Computer Link (450 GP), used to override other systems and control them remotely.
  • If it matters, the remaining 650 GP represents the units munitions stockpile; the weapons that require ammo can only be used until the units ammunition reserves are exhausted, whereupon it must restock.

T-1000:

  • Drop the Emergency Power (1400 GP), Hyperalloy Endoskeleton (300 GP), Iron Strike (1400 GP), Armored Framework (700 GP), Large and Heavy (700 GP), and Reroute Systems (168 GP), saving 4368 GP.
  • Add Disguise Self (2000 GP), Reduce Person (x.5, only to fit into and through small places, 700 GP), Summon Weapon (1400 GP), a selection of melee weapons (160 GP), and Reforming (Enhance Structure: +12 + 2 x Str Mod Temporary HP to a construct, reduces the base Hardness by 20% x.8 Personal Only x .7 = 1120 GP) at a cost of 5380 GP.
  • This effectively negates the first twenty-odd points worth of damage that a T-1000 takes each round, but reduces its Hardness to 8 and limits some of its other functions. In theory it leaves about 700 GP worth of Innate Enchantments to go, but I can’t think of anything at the moment. Perhaps a +1 resistance bonus to saving throws (700 GP)?
  • The T-1000 model is very difficult to physically damage, but lacks a solid internal structure to give it shape, strength, and support things like a concentrated energy source, computation, sensor systems, and more. All of those functions have to be distributed across every one of the nanites that makes it up – and it can only be as tough as the links between its nanites. Nanites that have to be able to do everything are always going to have a hard time matching dedicated systems. Unfortunately, it is also extremely resource-expensive to produce and the nanite swarm is highly unstable – making the system extremely vulnerable to program corruption. It may at any point malfunction, change its priorities and goals, subdivide, or even decide that it needs to replace Skynet, That’s why Skynet only deployed wholly-polymetal based Terminators as a last resort.

The T-1000 is also where the franchise makes the transition into complete fantasy; there are an awful lot of physics-related problems with the T-1000, even making allowances for future tech and nanites. Fortunately for Skynet, the Terminators get to run on movie physics instead of the real stuff.

T-3000:

  • The T-3000 does have many of the same abilities as the earlier Terminator models, but it is – quite blatantly – an acquired template, rather than an independent creation. I’ll be covering that template – and making the earlier models playable – next time around.

Eclipse d20 – Building Superheroic Characters and the New Mutants

To wind up and index this series it’s worth noting that there are a few notable differences between building characters for a Superhero setting and building for standard fantasy – but not as many as you might think.

  • These characters are all built using the Superheroic World Template from Eclipse – of which the important part is only one sentence long: “Each major character can spend (Con Mod) free points of Mana each round without drawing on their personal reserves – although they can’t save up those points” – and that really is quite enough.
  • Superheroic characters are not required to adhere to the Adventurer Framework. They don’t necessarily have to have any proficiencies, skills, or other bonuses at all.
  • Most of them will buy the Four-Color Package, since it covers a lot of the standard comic-book conventions. The occasional “bad-ass normal” may do without the four-color package, but they are the exception rather than the rule when it comes to superhumans.
  • Skills aren’t really important to heroes. While they ought to have some, and “badass normals” ought to have a LOT, superheroes generally have unlimited use of their special powers – and powers make a lot of skills obsolete. Lets say you can fly and transmute matter with a gesture. How many skills does that effectively replace? Ergo Superhumans should be expected to use Fast Learner, Adept, Augmented Bonus, and other tricks to avoid paying more than their skills are actually worth to them.
    • While we’re on skills it’s worth noting that most of the builds do not show any prerequisites for their martial arts. That’s because simply having the Four Color Package – and thus the inherent ability to bypass a lot of the normal limits of physics and the human body – is enough of a prerequisite for virtually any martial art style.
  • For equipment I’m using a default d20 Future Technology Level of Four – mostly because some bits of the tech level five stuff don’t currently exist and partially because that comes close enough to how high fantasy settings are usually portrayed. When you need to convert “Gold Pieces” to Dollars or “Credits” it’s 1 GP = 20 Dollars. Characters who want access to higher technologies or to magic items / “weird science” will have to justify that access somehow.
  • For Mutants & Masterminds conversions… Basic Attributes, building your own pocket realm, and my initial thoughts on damage and equipment are in the Magick writeup, Uncontrolled Powers and Mutants & Masterminds combat skills are discussed in the Magma writeup, the Valkyrie Template is in the Mirage writeup, the Technorganic Template and buying advanced technology is covered in the Warlock writeup, buying social abilities and absorption-based power-ups are discussed in Sunspot’s build, creating an orbital time-traveling manufacturing base comes up in Cable’s build, building magical dabblers turns up in Cypher’s build, and superheroic Equipment Packages are discussed under Domino.
  • Finally, while the original request was to use Eclipse to build Mutants & Masterminds versions of these characters for comparison, it’s important to note that I tend to focus on building them so that they work like they do in the comics, rather than adhering to Mutants & Masterminds rather rigid power level caps.

As for d20 power levels and a New Mutants Index…

Level One characters in a superhero world are generally either normal people (without any special powers or access to Mana) or empowered pre-adolescents – kids with powers. They aren’t necessarily WEAK – but whatever their power is they won’t have the skills, toughness, or have explored their powers ramifications enough to use it very effectively.

Level Two characters are generally starting metahumans, as well as older characters who simply have never gotten much attention / experience. This doesn’t necessarily mean that they’re weak – although, like Rusty (or any poorly-designed character), they certainly can be – but it does mean that any powerful abilities are likely to be pretty narrowly focused. Most superheroic campaigns will start with second or third level characters and progress slowly; After all, it took the original New Mutants a hundred issues to get from level one to level three or four. Characters on this level from the New Mutants include:

  • Boom-Boom has had an upgrade over the comics – this version has a much wider variety of fairly powerful munitions to call on – but she’s still basically demolitions girl. Her power is built using Equipage and an Immunity.
  • Feral is a fairly competent slasher, but – unless she gets to keep the ghostly powers I put in when she comes back – is basically good for nothing else at all. When you come right down to it… “I have the powers of a leopard!” is all very nice, but it’s more of a pulp hero power than a super hero power. Not too surprisingly, her power is built with Shapeshifting.
  • Rusty could surround himself with an aura of flame, and… well, there wasn’t much “and”. This version has the potential to add considerable variety to his basic ability, but still isn’t very impressive as superheroes go. His power is built with Presence and Metamagic.
  • Skids is a nice demonstration of specialization. She’s invulnerable to the point where most hero or villain teams will be unable to affect her. Unfortunately, she can’t really do anything much while being invulnerable except a little cheerleading for her companions (if any), which keeps her down at level two. Her powers been built with the Mystic Artist ability sequence.

Level Three characters tend to be your basic minor heros. Experienced characters with lame powers, really, REALLY, talented teen heroes, dependable team players with useful powers but few special tricks, and so on, all tend to be found here. And in this category we have…

  • Domino has an afterthought power of “things always going her way” (basically team luch) – except, of course, that they really did no such thing. She’s basically just kind of lucky in combat, so she has some Inherent Spells to make her so and a lot of experience as a mercenary.
  • Rictor is a fairly common type of hero, built with Rune Magic – and so possessing a fairly wide variety of abilities within a specific field. Like most such heroes (and anime characters) gesturing and announcing his attacks helps him focus his power.
  • Shatterstar is a super-soldier with a couple of minor vibrational tricks, decent leadership abilities, and swords. Now there’s nothing wrong with swords, or with super-soldiers, but super-soldiers tend to be valiant and stick at being just a bit more than human rather than being en route to cosmic power. Shatterstar pulls it off with a bit of Shapeshifting cheese and some Inherent Spells to give him a big dose of personal bonuses.
  • Warpath is actually a bit like Shatterstar – using the same general Shapeshifting effects to channel “totem spirits”, but also uses an Inherent Spell to pull off various superstrength tricks and Witchcraft to boost his strength and access some shamanic powers. Warpath his probably reached his limit on raw strength, but – if he focuses on further super-strength tricks and/or his shamanic powers he may well keep on moving up the ranks.

Level Four and Level Five heroes are often well-rounded types who are moving up. The ones who stick at this level usually have a big “but” in their descriptions. Their power may be highly useful and versatile but it also has some major flaw. They may have some very powerful specific ability, but they have little else beyond their one trump card. They may have pushed some minor, versatile, ability to the limits, but have nowhere else to go with it. Their powers may be extremely potent, but impossible to fully control. And they usually have no way around that “but”.

  • Cypher (L4) has some excellent techno-organic boosts to his toughness and ability to interface with computers, has some combat boosts, and has very limited access to magic – but he’s really pushed “I am a super linguist!” just about as far as it can possibly go. Most of this powers are built on Luck and Innate Enchantment.
  • Karma (L4) possesses a high-end set of Inherent Spells (psionic powers in her case), a few boosters for Psionic Dominate, and just a bit of general telepathy. That’s a pretty good power – but it’s very specific and if her targets are unaffected or simply resist… all she’s really got left is a minor psychic blast, and I put that in.
  • Magma (L4) has a powerful and fairly versatile ability, but has control issues. If she ever manages to surpass those, she’ll soon be moving up the power scale. Her abilities are built with Shapeshifting to an Elemental Form and with Rune Magic.
  • Wolfsbane (L5) winds up here thanks to her wide range of abilities. A basic wolf-shifter – and even one that gets to use a Dire Wolf transitional form in combat – isn’t that formidable as superheroes go, but when you throw in an array of enhanced senses and being good at stealth and infiltration, she can be pretty effective. If you accept my speculation that her powers are based on tapping into the power of the Asgardian wolf gods she may continue moving up the scale if she ever learns to really use the Rune Magic that opens up to her.

Level Six and Level Seven are about where “superheroes” start in basic d20 games. With the constant supply of Mana provided by the Superheroic World Template, this is the start of true Demigods – characters who often possess a wide range of powerful abilities, who can often defeat sizeable groups of high-end agents and minions and put up a potentially victorious fight against entire teams of minor heroes, who often command great resources, and who often have only one or two flaws that keep them from competing effectively with the near-gods above them. These are the characters who can fight high-end opponents without needing a team.

  • Cannonball (L7) is your classic flying brick – Flight, Invulnerability, Super-Strength (with immortality as a bonus). With ranged and area effect blasts and a variety of special tricks – including reflecting major attacks and containing strategic nuclear weaponry as well as flying through earth and stone. About the only thing that keeps him from competing with Superman is that his defenses drop when he’s not using his powers. While he’s got Inherent Spells and Innate Enchantments, like many characters at this level he’s a specialized Reality Editor as well.
  • Magick (L7) is an extreme range teleporter, a time traveler, commands a legion of demons, is a formidable witch almost anywhere and is sorceress supreme of Limbo, wears extremely durable mystic armor, and wields a magical blade capable of almost one-shotting the Dread Dormamu. Doctor Strange said that there wasn’t much that he could teach her about magic. What made Magick a team player instead of a cosmic power was simply the fact that she was a giant bundle of control issues; her dark powers caused at least as much trouble as they solved. Magick is (literally!) infernally complicated, and is built with Rune Magic, Witchcraft, Sanctum, Blessing, Leadership, Ritual Magic, and more. Her build also includes a lot of the basic discussions on converting d20 to Mutants & Masterminds.
  • Mirage (L6 with a +1 ECL Valkyrie template) has some shamanic training, the ability to pull emotionally-charged images out of people’s heads and manifest them, a minor death goddess and soulguide, and an astounding team medic, since she can fight off death to keep people alive. As such, she’s another complicated build – with a template full of death-related powers, several forms of Rune Magic, and some cheesy Shapeshifting to get some “badass normal” boosts. Given her limited offensive abilities (at least as of now) she needs a team – but more experience and magical self-development may change that.
  • Sunspot is a generalist. He flies, he wields solar powers, he has super strength, he heals himself, he absorbs energy, he has a very extensive array or social and business connections, he can buy up evil organizations and convert them to benign ones, and he’s pretty tough. He may not be at the top of the scale in any of those things unless he’s powered up from absorbing extra energy, but he’s pretty well up there in ALL of them – which is a major power in itself. He’s built with Hysteria, Berserker, Grant of Aid, Rune Magic, Innate Enchantment, Enthusiast, and Immunity – mostly because he has a similar multiplicity of powers.
  • Warlock (L4 with a +2 ECL Race) is powerful and versatile – in fact he’s powerful enough to make it up to this level even with a great big “but” attached to him. In his case that “But” is pacifism; he has a powerful racial template and an immense variety of built-in equipment and weapons (Innate Enchantment) – but he mostly winds up providing transportation, rescue services, and utility powers.

Levels Eight to Twelve are where the big boys hang out. Extremely durable characters with a wide variety of powerful abilities and the ability to affect massive areas fit in here. In the case of the New Mutants… about the only character who hits this level is Cable, and even then only at his peak.

It’s important to note that this puts the peak end for unlimited-use superheroic abilities somewhat below the peak end for limited-use baseline d20 abilities. This is in no way a coincidence; d20 is notorious for including a bunch of “game-breaking” powers at near-epic levels. Still, a character who occasionally uses Time Stop or casts Wish can be dealt with. A character who can stop time until they feel like letting it move on again or who gets unlimited wishes? Not so easy to deal with.

  • Cable and Graymalkin (L8) are – not unexpectedly – potentially game-breaking. After all, they’re time travelers with teleportation and the ability to build super-technology who are more or less literally here to kill their equivalent o Hitler and revise their own pasts. Cable enjoys massive bonuses thanks to his use of Legendarium, has a bucket-load of skills, is an immensely powerful Rune Mage, and is a walking time paradox maintained by his own ongoing Reality Editing.

Levels 13+ are pretty much for Cosmic Powers, and are usually best left to NPC’s.. An unlimited supply of Mana and a high level lets you do a decent job of building cosmic beings, or at least aspects thereof – but why bother? You don’t really need statistics for Death or Eternity or any other character of that level; they more or less are the setting and define the adventures, rather than actually participating in them.

Eclipsing Warpath

This, finally, leaves Warpath, previously known as Thunderbird II.

Warpath was Thunderbird I’s little brother, and originally appeared as a member of the Hellions, out to avenge his older brothers death (he blamed Xavier). And this was good; the kid had just enough power to be a creditable threat, a good motive, and – as the hero-worshiping little brother of a heroically deceased teammate – a solid emotional claim on the heroes that he was out to get. It was reasonably plausible and led to several classic plotlines. As usual, after exploring a few of those classic plotlines, he did the “redemption arc” thing and became a hero, even if he was still pretty hot tempered and vengeance-driven.

Warpath joined the New Mutants under Cable in issue 99 after his tribe was massacred, and so was a part of the transition to X-Force (and the final 100’th issue of the New Mutants) and soon hit stage four (below) to become the team muscle.

So what did he do? Well…answering THAT question is more than a bit awkward.

  1. Initially Warpath was strong, tough, and fast, if only modestly superhuman. He may or may not have had some enhanced senses. Sometimes he was regenerative and sometimes not. That varied from story to story like it does for most comic book characters. Anyway, he was a pretty standard big tough guy with a minor power (the boosted senses) to help distinguish him from all the other big tough guys out there.
  2. He then developed the ability to run at up to 100 MPH and swiftly climb walls. OK. Why not? He was more or less a super-athlete and 100 MPH is less than four times the record for a normal human athlete.
  3. Then he DEFINITELY had some enhanced senses. That worked well enough with the whole enhanced athlete / wilderness warrior thing even if it really didn’t seem too closely related to his boosted physique. He was getting to the end of this stage when he joined Cable’s new team.
  4. He then seemed to lose the super-running and wall-climbing in favor of becoming MUCH bigger, stronger, and tougher (up in the “on even terms with the Juggernaut” range). I guess he was a growing boy? Still… losing powers is a bit weird. So is putting on an extra six feet of height and at least a fifteen hundred pounds of bone and muscle. He stayed in this stage through most of X-Force’s initial run.
  5. Then he got smaller again (losing a lot of strength and toughness) and learned to fly thanks to some advanced training with a guy who throws energy knives (What? Why? HOW? Isn’t this equivalent to Captain America or Colossus training to become flying midgets?). I think there was something about his eyesight being better as well, but I’m none too sure – and it may have just been somebody recalling the “enhanced senses” thing.
  6. Then he got some vibranium knives (which at least makes sense; the really strong guy picked up some really tough weapons) and demonstrated a fair degree of skill in slicing people up with them.
  7. Then he apparently lost the ability to fly and picked up basic shamanic powers and rituals from Ghost Rider (wait, what is a demonic possession victim doing teaching Amerindian shamanism? Oh never mind, maybe he was just helping a bit or something).
  8. Later on, he learned to fly again, although he seems to be back to normal size and his strength and toughness are down a great deal. He still has sharp pointy knives though!

Anyway, according to the Wikis, his current strength, speed, level of invulnerability, speed, stamina, healing, and most other items are “unknown” since they’ve varied quite freely from “slightly superhuman” to “godlike” across his career – and not in the consistently-better “I gained some levels” style of d20.

Fortunately, there are ways in Eclipse to deal with characters with wildly varying abilities, rather than taking THIS approach and giving him multiple versions: In this case it’s going to be…

Totemic Channeling: Shapeshift, with Growth, Attribute Modifiers, Hybrid Form, Clear Speech, and Variants (Almost entirely human appearance), Specialized and Corrupted/the animal chosen may only be changed through a shamanic ceremony on a Solstice or Equinox, outside of this the user cannot change forms, only to take on animal powers, cannot be further upgraded, user may be called on to act on behalf of the spirits of nature on occasion, can only call on totems of species that still exist and were active in his tribal territory within the last two centuries (10 GP).

  • Mountain Lion: Str +6, Dex +8, Con +4, Move +10, +1 Natural Armor, Climb 20, Low-Light Vision, Scent, +4 to Acrobatics, Athletics, and Stealth. Improved Grab. Two 1d4 attacks. (Stage 2).
  • Grizzly Bear: Large Size. Str +16, Dex +2, Con +8, +5 Natural Armor, +10 Move, Two 1d8 attacks, Low-Light Vision, Scent, and Improved Grab. +4 to Athletics (Swim). A very good totem, but incredibly conspicuous and very awkward. (Stage 4).
  • Eagle (Medium Sized): Str +4, Con +4, Dex +2, +1 Natural Armor, 80′ Flight (Average), two 1d4 attacks. Low-Light Vision, +8 on visual Perception checks. (Stage 5). Not so good on the attribute bonuses, but the ability to fly can come in pretty handy.

While other animals are certainly possible, most of the other major possibilities – badger, boar, otter, beaver, squirrel, weasel, horse, etc – are far less effective and/or very special purpose to be stuck with for at least three months. Generally I’d stick with the Lion or Eagle. The Grizzly Bear totem is very powerful – but being a giant is generally going to kill your social life, drive your expenses through the roof, and prevent you from going anywhere as a civilian. It’s only a good idea if you’re obsessed with war or vengeance or something and will have access to all kinds of special support.

Oh wait. That fits precisely. Thus Warpath going into giant warrior mode during his X-Factor days.

As usual, shapeshifting cheese works just fine in superhero settings, but probably won’t be allowed in most others.

So:

Warpath / James Proudstar

Level Three Totemic Warrior

Four Color Package (24 CP):

  • This includes Superheroic Physics, Superheroic Durability, Superheroic Build, Rapid Recovery, Minor Conventions (Ready for Inspection, Comics Code, It’s Sufficient, Heroic Will, Heroic Rally, Coincidental Catch, Heroic Health, and a Minor Benefit (see below).

Pathfinder Package Deal (Free).

Pathfinder Human (Free)

Basic Abilities: Str 14 (+2 Enh), Int 12, Wis 13 (+2 Human = 15), Con 16 (+2 Enh), Str 14, Dex 14 (+2 Enh), Cha 10 (Pathfinder 25-Point Buy).

  • Lion Totem: Str 22, Dex 24, Con 22
  • Bear Totem: Str 32. Dex 18, Con 26
  • Hawk Totem: Str 20, Dex 18, Con 22
  • He can activate another +6 boost to strength if he needs to.

Given that this alone gives us eight different attribute arrays to work with, I’m simply going to assume that Warpath is using the Lion Totem (without the further strength boost) for the rest of this writeup.

Other Powers:

Wild Man: Innate Enchantment: All abilities Spell Level 1/2 pr 1 x Caster Level One x 2000 GP Unlimited-Use Use-Activated x.7 Personal-Only where relevant (11,200 GP net value, 12 CP).

  • Enhanced Attributes: +2 Enhancement Bonus to Str, Dex, and Con.(4200 GP).
  • Personal Haste, x.5 / only to boost movement (700 GP).
  • Disguise Self x.5 / only to cover up animalistic traces and provide occasional GM-controlled makeovers and changes of look (700 GP).
  • Stabilize: Automatically stabilizes if below zero hit points (700 GP).
  • +3 Competence Bonus to Perception (700 GP).
  • Inspiring Word: +1 Morale Bonus to saves, attacks, checks, and damage (1400 GP)
  • Ward of Heaven: +1 Luck bonus to AC and Saves (1400 GP).
  • Resistance: +1 Resistance Bonus to Saves (700 GP).
  • Fortune’s Favor: +1 Luck Bonus to Checks (700 GP).

Brick Tricks: Mana Powered Inherent Spell I (Specialized, only as a prerequisite) and II (Greater Invocation of “Brick Tricks”. Warpath may produce strength-based effects of up to level two – flicking small items with deadly speed and accuracy (Kinetic Bolt), sealing doors by twisting the frames out of shape (Wizard Lock), knocking people down by creating earth tremors (Stomp), shouting with tremendous volume (Shatter or Sound Burst, later Shout or Energy Cone), imitate various special combat maneuvers, and so on (9 CP).

Shamanic Training: Mana-Powered Witchcraft II (12 CP) with Pacts of Spirit and Duties (-12 CP).

  • Basic Witch Abilities:
    • The Adamant Will. Warpath was hunting Xavier and Jean. He pretty much required this.
    • Dreamfaring: Specialized for No Cost / only to sense and interact with Spirits as if they were solid.
    • Healing: Specialized for no cost / only to instantly repair minor personal injuries, reducing their effect by 3 (In essence, add DR 3/- on top of his other defenses).
    • Hyloka, Specialized / Warpath is essentially immune to Fatigue.
    • Shadoweave, Specialized / only to provide impressive effects during shamanic ceremonies.
    • Elfshot, Specialized and Corrupted for Increased Effect / only usable to chase away or bind spirits.
    • Witchsight
  • Advanced Witchcraft Abilities:
    • Wrath of the Sea (6 CP). Provides a +6 bonus to Strength when active.
    • Bones of Iron (6 CP): Provides various enhancements to durability when active.

Minor Privilege: Gets the “X-Man Equpment Package” for free (3 CP).

Standard “X-Man” package (13,000 GP):

  • Kevlar Reinforced Costume (“Leather Armor”, but 40 GP and only 5 pounds), Masterwork (+150 GP), +1 (+1000 GP), Amulet of Tears (2300 GP. This can provide up to +36 HP per day. Armor Crystal: a Lesser Iron Ward Diamond (2000 GP). This isn’t a big deal, but every little bit helps.
  • Advanced First Aid Kit / Healing Belt (750 GP).
  • “Pocket Secretary”/Hero Team Comlink: Satellite Smartphone with HUD and hands-free links (250 GP), Smartsearch (As per a Tome of Worldly Memory, 1500 GP), Intelligent (500 GP), Int, Wis, Chr all 10 (0 GP), 30′ senses, uses Message at will (1000 GP). Note that, since smartphones can talk anyway, there is no need to buy speech for it.
  • Reactive Contact Lenses / Raptors Mask (3500 GP).+5 to Spot (Perception), Immunity to being Blinded or Dazzled.
  • Utility Pouch: Keys, LED minilight, multitool, chalk, nylon ties, etc. All the little junk that pops up once in a blue moon (10 GP).

.

Skills:

Skill Boosters: Upgrade Human Fast Learner to +2 SP/Level (3 CP), Fast Learner, Specialized in Skills for +2 SP/Level (6 CP), Adept (Athletics, Expertise (Apache Amerindian), Intimidation, and Perception, 6 CP), Imposing Build (Augmented Bonus; adds (Str Mod) to (Cha Mod) for skill purposes, 6 CP).

Available Skill Points: 24 (Fast Learner) +6 (Int Mod x 6) = 30

Purchased Skills (All +1 Luck, +1 Morale):

  • Acrobatics 2 (+7 Dex +4 Lion = +15)
  • Apache Warrior Combat (Unarmed Martial Art) 6 (+7 Dex = +15)
  • Athletics 6 *(+6 Str +4 Lion = +18)
  • Deception 1 (+6 Str = +9)
  • Expertise (Apache Native) 6* (+1 Int = +9)
  • Expertise (Apache Shamanism( 2 (+1 Int = +5)
  • Insight 4 (+2 Wis = +8)
  • Intimidation 6* (+0 Cha +6 Str = +14)
  • Perception 6* (+2 Wis +3 Comp = +13)
  • Stealth 2 (+7 Dex +4 Lion = +15)
  • Treatment/Medicine 3 (+1 Int = +6)

Apache Warrior Abilities: Defenses +2, Toughness 2, Expertise x2 (may trade bonuses between Attack, Armor Class, and Damage), and Improved Critical.

Basics:

  • BAB: +3, Corrupted/does not contribute to iterative attacks (12 CP).
  • Hit Dice: 12 (L1d12, 8 CP) +12 (L2-3d8, 8 CP) +12 (Immortal Vigor) +30 (Con Mod x 5) = 66 HP (Mutants & Masterminds Toughness +9 base, +10 with extra DR, +11 with Uniform).
  • Saving Throws (All +1 Each Luck, Morale, and Resistance)
    • Fortitude +2 (6 CP) +6 (Con) = +11
    • Reflex +0 (0 CP) +7 (Dex) = +10
    • Will +2 (6 CP) +2 (Wis) = +8
  • Proficiencies: All Apache Weapons (6 CP).
  • Armor Class: 10 (Base) +7 (Dex) +3 (Armor) +1 (Natural) +2 (Martial Art) = 23
  • Attacks:
    • Melee Attack: +10/+10 (+3 BAB +6 Str +1 Morale), 1d8+7, Crit 19-20/x2.(Mutants & Masterminds Damage +11)
    • Boosted-Strength Melee Attack: +13/+13 (+3 BAB +9 Str +1 Morale), 1d8+10, Crit 19-20 20/x2.(Mutants & Masterminds Damage +12)

Point Costs:

  • Four Color Package: 24 CP
  • Totemic Channeling: 10 CP
  • Innate Enchantment: 12 CP
  • Brick Tricks: 9 CP
  • Shamanic Training: 12 CP
  • X-Man Gear: 3 CP
  • Skill Boosters: 21 CP
  • Purchased Skill Points: 0 CP
  • BAB: 12 CP
  • Hit Dice: 16 CP
  • Saving Throws: 12 CP
  • Proficiencies: 6 CP

That comes to 135 CP.

Available Character Points: 96 (level three base) +10 (Disadvantages: History, Compulsive (Vengeful), and Accursed (cannot maintain social relationships) +6 (Heroic Duties) +18 (Human, L1, and L3 Feats) +9 (Restrictions: will not go beyond light armor, primitive weaponry, and avoids everything beyond basic shamanism) = 139 CP.

But wait! We have 4 CP left over!

Not to worry; they’ll be turning up under “Equipment”, below.

Remaining Details:

  • Minor Four-Color Ability: Immortal Vigor I
  • Equipment: As a third level character Warpath is entitled to 3000 GP worth of gear. Given that he doesn’t normally use all that much, I’m going to assume a wilderness survival package, some sort of battered old jeep, a trunk full of shamanic gear, and a comfortable lifestyle.

Now we actually have a threefold problem; Warpath was given a pair of Vibranium Daggers as a gift. Unfortunately, D20 really doesn’t cover gifts, the stuff is supposed to be absurdly expensive (each dagger would cost millions), and Vibranium itself is actually pretty ill-defined. The stuff is supposed to absorb vibration and kinetic energy, at least up to a certain limit – which will destroy it (and presumably release that energy). Thus Captain America’s vibranium-alloy Shield can take a hit from Mjolnir without moving enough to break it’s bearer’s arm. So… how does HE move it? He’d have to be pushing it much harder than Mjolnir. And why doesn’t Vibranium absorb energy from the environment until it explodes? I suppose that it’s just comic-book logic. Vibranium is a super-metal, so it’s super-good at whatever you need, and so absorbs vibration and kinetic energy only when it’s user needs it to do so. Also, such items never seem to get lost or stolen for long, no matter how irreplaceable they are.

Ergo…

  • Create Relic, Specialized and Corrupted / the GM decides what he should have because actually he just picks things up from somewhere or does poorly understood shamanic rituals, only works with the points from Enthusiast (so if he loses something it either comes back or gets replaced) (2 CP).
  • Enthusiast, Specialized for Increased Effect (2 floating CP) and Corrupted for Reduced Cost / only usable with Create Relics (2 CP).

His unbreakable daggers are basically just a special effect; his medicine bundle simply increases his damage die from 1d4 to 1d8 (6 CP) and allow him to use a couple of mana-powered first level effects – a no-range Silence effect and Protection from Sonic Energy (6 CP) – for a net Relic cost of 2 CP.

Warpath was actually a bit of a challenge; he’s had his powers revamped so many times that it’s pretty tricky to try and make him consistent within a single build – and gives him a surprising level of versatility and power simply because doing it called for several slices of cheese. Still, his role on a team is usually to be the tank – so he needs to be able to withstand a lot of attacks.