Glowstone Alchemy Part II – The Items

   In part II (part one is back HERE) we have a selection of the glowstone devices generally available on Shandar and their usual prices. Elsewhere, of course, the availability and price of such things is more a matter of the availability of glowstone. Off Shandar, some of these items may be considered priceless relics.

   Using Alchemy in place of Glowstone Alchemy increased the listed DC’s by +20. There is no known effective substitute for Glowstone. As a rule, a Glowstone Alchemist can be assisted by up to five aides. Slaves are preferred on Shandar since they’re more readily disposed of if they should make a mistake and contaminate themselves with too much glowstone.

   Blazegems, Lightrods, and Firelances use a core of glowstone encased in crystal, and electrum with an optional focusing gem – although most of them have an outer casing of wood and steel to provide physical protection and support for the relatively fragile core. Like all items which mix glowstone and silver, they resonate with their user’s life force, allowing them to be triggered by mental command. They normally fire simple bolts of radiant energy as a ranged touch attack, but can be fitted with focusing gems to convert them to fire various types of elemental damage – but this requires about an hours skilled work IF an appropriately-cut and alchemically-treated gem is available. While their energy reserve is limited, they normally rebuild it at rate of roughly one shot per hour. If someone channels positive energy into them directly (usually by touch) they will regain charges as listed for “Recharge”. Negative energy will deplete the same number of charges. While excess positive energy is wasted, excess negative energy can reduce the number of charges below zero, resulting in a deficient which must be overcome to add more charges. If these items are exposed to a positive or negative energy burst use the “Burst Charge” listing. Finally, since these items are linked with their user’s, their damage increases somewhat as the user’s level increases.

Weapon

Blazegem

Lightrod

Firelance

Usage

One-Handed

Two-Handed

Mounted

Type

Simple

Martial

Exotic

Damage

2d6*, 4d6 Max

3d6*, 6d6 Max

4d6*, 8d6 Max

Increment

1d6/6 levels

1d6/4 levels

1d6/3 levels

Critical

20, x2

20,x3

19-20, x3

Range Inc.

40 feet

80 feet

120 feet

Charges

12

20

40

Recharge

3d4

2d4

1d4

Burst Charge

3

2

1

Tolerance

3

5

8

Weight

2 Lb

6 Lb

160 Lb

Cost

100 GP

200 GP

1800 GP

Craft DC

18

24

30

   Bloodshaping Talismans are usually made as knives or wristlets with a sharpened edge or decoration since, to use them, the user must shed his or her own blood with them. As the blood flows onto the surface of the talisman, the user may concentrate on the talisman (a standard action) to give that blood a temporary independent life – transforming it into a bloodwrought version of a normal animal or dire animal with DR 5/-, Darksight, a telepathic link to their creator, and complete loyalty to him or her. Sadly, this costs hit points – due to blood drain – equal to one-half the hits of the creature created and such creatures will revert to an inert splatter of blood in 4d6 hours. Tolerance 3, 800 GP, Craft DC 20.

   City Walls are a combination of large quantities of glowstone (which provides the power), of ceremonial magic (massive complexes of inlaid circles, carven inscriptions, and complex talismans which channel and transform that power), and of lesser enchantments which maintain, manipulate (to open gates and trigger active defenses), direct, and defend, the various ceremonial elements. City walls can be negated on a local level temporarily – enough for a gate, or for someone or something to slip inside – without attempting the massive task of breaking them down entirely. Mere physical walls are usually present too, but – thanks to the need to block flyers, tunnelers, teleporters, and magical attacks – are a far less important element than the magical barriers. On Shandar, where negative-energy tornadoes, massive disruptions, and powerful magical attacks are all too common, barriers incorporating the equivalent of a permanent wall of force, countermagical protection, and an effect which damages anyone who attacks or attempts to interfere with the wall are considered a bare minimum for long-term survival. Larger and more powerful cities prefer the equivalent of a Prismatic Sphere or some epic-level effect. Tolerance 4 (for operators, who generally come in crowds), prices are in the hundreds of thousands of GP, and the Craft DC is at least 5x the level of the spell being duplicated.

   Creodwar are small glowstone-glass flasks designed to infuse their contents with glowstone energies. While such “potions” are unstable – the magical charge for lasts less then an hour after the contents are decanted – their effects can equate to those of spells of up to the level (I-III) of the flask used with a casting level of 2/5/10. It normally requires 1d6 hours per level of the effect being produced for the contents to fully charge. Plain water will become equivalent to holy water (or multiple doses thereof at higher levels), more complex mixtures can be charged to produce a wide variety of specific magical and alchemical effects.

   Common concoctions produced in Creodwar include magical plant-growth fertilizers, formulas which purify water when added to it, healing mixtures, flaredrops (depending on the variant employed, these may emit blinding flashes or simply provide light for hours when exposed to air), spell powders (these provide the equivalent of +1 mana for spellcasting purposes one time per level of the flask being used), stimulants, and the equivalent of a wide variety of spells. Tolerance 1/2/3, 1250, 2500, and 5000 GP. Craft DC 15, 20, and 25.

   Deathbane weapons are simply the result applying a glowstone surface – whether temporary or permanent – to a weapon. Such weapons do an extra 2d6 points of damage to undead and count as magical weapons for the purposes of penetrating undead damage reduction if they are not already enchanted.

  • Banedrops are roughly equivalent to Blade Venom, although the effect lasts for an hour or so. Unfortunately, if the user accidently injures himself or herself with a weapon to which Banedrops have been applied, he or she will need no make a DC 25 fortitude save or pick up one point of glowstone contamination.
  • Permanently alchemically tempering a weapon with concentrated glowstone can give it this property permanently, albeit with a significant tolerance cost. Applying an even greater amount can give it the equivalent of the “Disruption” power – still without affecting any existing enchantment – but exposes the user to a great deal of glowstone energy.
  • Banedrops 40 GP/Dose, Craft DC 15, Deathbane Weapon 1200 GP, Tolerance 2, Craft DC 20, Disruption Weapon, 5000 GP, Tolerance 5, Craft DC 25.

   Draconic Resonance: At least on Shandar, monetary metals and magical devices – such as are to be found in many treasures – are almost invariably contaminated with trace quantities of glowstone. Those who claim such treasures tend to be affected by them. In small quantities, and over brief periods, this has no effect. If, however, one is foolish enough to amass a great horde of treasure without breaking it up and putting it to use, it’s accumulated energies are likely to begin gradually transforming its “owner”. The first effects are usually psychological, and often include an increasing bond with the horde – and an unwillingness to even consider removing anything from it. Simple physical enhancements will appear next, then magical powers related to the contents of the horde, and – finally – the physical mutations will begin. On Shandar, monsters don’t really have treasure hordes. Treasure hordes have monsters…

   Glowstone Engines channel and transform glowstone energy into mechanical power and a sort of quasi-life force. Fitting an appropriate construct, machine, or vehicle, with a glowstone engine of the appropriate size (larger engines can be constructed if you want to create a city power plant or some such) will provide endless energy – eliminating any need for fuel, ammunition, or maintenance, replacing any conventional engine, providing a +5 bonus on any rolls required to operate the device (including it’s weapons, if any), and allowing it to heal normally with minor assistance (thus a device powered by a glowstone engine can be repaired – if slowly – by an essentially unskilled individual). If used in the creation of a golem or other animated construct the costs – in both XP and Gold – are reduced by two-thirds. A pilot who operates a glowstone-powered vehicle or machine on a daily or near-daily basis will need to make a DC 15 Fortitude save monthly to avoid picking up a point of Glowstone Contamination. Casual users need only save once per year.

Size

Cost

Craft DC

Tiny

2500

25

Small

1250

20

Medium

2500

25

Large

5000

25

Huge

10,000

25

Gargantuan

20,000

20

Colossal

40,000

20

Power Plant

100,000

20

   Glowstone Tempering infuses an item with glowstone, but directs it’s energies towards protecting and preserving it – allowing the glowstone to bear the brunt of magical effects directed at destroying or disrupting the item. In Shandar, glowstone-tempered items are impervious to the corrosive effects of Balefire and exposure to the Cinghalum. Secondarily, if more importantly in less hostile realms, glowstone tempering also prevents the magical properties of an item from being affected by Dispelling and protects the item itself from negative-energy based attacks and Disintegration. Tempered items even receive a second save against Disjunction effects if the first save fails. 1200 GP, DC 15 for mundane items, 20 for magical ones. Tolerance 1 in either case.

   An equivalent effect can be produced by binding the life-force of an outsider into an item – a preferred alternative on Shandar, where life is cheap, but glowstone is an invaluable resource.

   Hearts of Light are glowstone-infused gems in settings of ithal, markhhan, and crystal, which accumulate positive energy and release it to augment the user’s positive-energy channeling efforts. Sadly, they are not cumulative; only the strongest Heart of Light of a particular type used in an effort counts. Hearts of Light may be used three times per hour. A given Heart of Light may add to the Intensity (maximum hit die affected) and/or to the Magnitude (“turning damage”) of a positive-energy channeling effect when used. They have a base DC of 10 to make and a base cost of 2000 GP

Magnitude

DC

Cost

Tolerance

 

Intensity

DC

Cost

Tolerance

+0d6

+0

+0 GP

+0

 

+0

+0

+0 GP

+0

+2d6

+5

+1000

+1

 

+2

+5

+100

+1

+4d6

+10

+3000

+2

 

+4

+10

+300

+2

+6d6

+15

+5000

+3

 

+6

+15

+5000

+3

   Ithal, a glowstone-silver alloy, is ductile, light, and faintly luminescent. It resonates with it’s user’s life energy and thus always – at least in the hands of a living creature – feels as natural and easy to use as it’s bearers own limbs. Making Ithal has a DC of 20.

  • When used by a living creature:
    • Ithal Weapons gain a +2 circumstance on attacks and damage. +2000 GP, +1 Tolerance.
    • Ithal Tools provide a +2 circumstance bonus on relevant skills. +500 GP, +1 Tolerance
    • Ithal Armor is treated as being one category lighter, has no armor check penalty, does not limit the user’s maximum dexterity bonus, and reduces arcane spell failure percentages by 15%.
  • Ithal has 50 hit points per inch of thickness, hardness 12, is immune to the corruption of the Cinghalum, and 50% resistant to Banefire. +3000 GP, +3 Tolerance.
  • Since it resonates with the user’s life force, Ithal will transfer all touch-based effects other than those based on negative energy, which are blocked by the glowstone that infuses it, to or from the user.

   Light Crystals consist of fine strands of highly refined glowstone embedded in crystal. Not too surprisingly, they glow constantly, illuminating a radius of twenty feet per level of the crystal and disrupting darkness-based effects of lower level within that area. Unfortunately, they also become hotter as they become larger, crystals of above level seven tend to melt down and severely contaminate the entire area. Crystals of level three and above will annoy light-sensitive creatures within the area they illuminate. DC of 10 + 3x the level of the crystal, 500 GP times the level of the crystal squared (primarily due to how vital they were in food production), Tolerance 1 if carried.

   Light Crystals feed a constant trickle of life-force into every creature within the area they illuminate. Plants grow (Level x Level) times faster, and yield some three times the amount normally expected – at that accelerated scale, allowing a relatively small cavern so illuminated to yield substantial amounts of food. Other creatures exposed to the light heal twice as quickly while so exposed, but also age twice as quickly.

  • Areas exposed to the radiance of a light crystal of level three or more for a week or more are treated as being Consecrated. Undead entering such areas will suffer one point of damage and will take one more point of damage for each hour they remain. Minor undead will not usually enter such as area unless compelled. Unfortunately, such areas also annoy light-sensitive creatures.

   On Shandar, where most attempts to “farm” outside the magical barriers which protect the cities would be relatively unproductive at best and suicidal at worst, Light Crystals with the Accelerate Plant Growth property are one of the major factors that make keeping a fair-sized population alive possible. Similarly, glowstone powers the barriers that keep the monsters of the wilds out and the weapons that the people of the cities use to defend themselves. Of course, it’s also what slowly poisons them – but the occasional death from glowstone-induced illness and degeneration is of small consequence compared to a horrific and agonized massacre at the hands of a horde of undead monstrosities.

   Sadly, competition for glowstone – and the survival it makes possible – also lies at the root of the endless conflicts between the cities of Shandar and the houses within them. Whether harvested from the monster-infested wilderness, obtained in trade from the Hin, or taken from another city, if you want your children and grandchildren to live, your city and your house’s stocks of glowstone must be maintained and increased. The fact that the cities of Shandar are almost entirely inhabited by long-lived elves, who may have a dozen or more children over the course of a generation, just makes things worse.

   Mana Batteries are made of glowstone, markhhan (see below), and the imprisoned soul of a sapient being. They have a capacity of 1d4+2 points of mana, regain one point of mana per day on their own, and may be recharged from external sources of mana. Given that – on Shandar – the practice of the higher magics requires a good deal of extra mana to make up for the energy drain of the Cinghalum, there are few mages (no matter how scrupulous) who do not occasionally resort to the use of a Mana Battery. 1500 GP, Tolerance 1, DC 18.

   Markhhan, an alloy of glowstone, gold, mercury, and copper, is soft, easily worked, and quasi-living as far as simple detection magic is concerned. While it’s simple physical properties are unimpressive, Markhhan can anchor and sustain a spirit as if it was a living body. If actually linked with a living body, it can be mentally directed and moved as if it was a part of that body within the limits of it’s jointing – although doing so will feel quite unnatural unless the Markhan is at least partially plated with Ithal. Markhhan is principally useful in the construction of simple replacement parts (and, with relatively minor additional enchantments, sensory organs), in the creation of SoulWards and related devices, and in the construction of quasi-animated chain weapons (equivalent to the Chain of Ki discipline with Entangle and Third Hand from Eclipse: The Codex Persona). DC 18 to make, the prices for replacement limbs usually start at about 1200 GP (since they’re mostly made of conventional materials) and a tolerance of 2. Sensory organ replacements usually run about 4000 GP and have a Tolerance of 3. Chain Weapons usually cost about 3000 GP extra and have a Tolerance of 2.

   Rings and Talismans of Fortitude channel extra life-force into the wearer’s body. While it does not become a part of their essence, it can still reinforce them on the physical side, granting them the potential for extra hit points. Sadly, that’s potential only; if a character with no constitution bonus has 28 out of 52 hits and puts on a level II (+16) Talisman of Fortitude, he or she will still have 28 hit points at the moment – but can now heal or be healed up to a total of (52 + 16) = 68. Such Talismans provide (8 + Con Mod) hit points per level, and do stack within limits: the most potent Talisman has it’s full effect, the effective level of the second most powerful is reduced by one, the effective level of the third by three and so on. Unfortunately, their impact on the user’s glowstone tolerance rating is not so reduced. DC of 10 + 5*Level, Cost of 500 GP for L1, 3000 GP for L2, 4500 GP for L3, 7500 GP for L4, 12,000 GP for L5, and so on. Tolerance of 1/Level.

   Seardan, a glowstone-iron alloy, is usually blue-black (since polishing it enough to achieve it’s potentially silver-blue state may require years of pointless labor or a high-level spell) and emits hot sparks when struck. In Seardan the energies of the glowstone go into enhancing the bonds between iron atoms, causing the molecular structure of the alloy to compact itself, becoming somewhat denser than lead and incredibly tough and hard. In general, working Seardan requires either a blast furnace and superhuman strength or a fairly powerful (usually level 4) specifically-designed spell to soften it. Additional similar spells designed to plate it over other metals (since items made entirely of Seardan are usually unmanageably heavy), and repair it are also in order. Making Seardan is fairly easy, it’s doing something with it after it hardens that’s hard. DC 15.

  • Seardan-Plated weapons ignore hardness of 20 or less. +2000 GP, Tolerance 2.
  • Tools plated with Seardan provide a +2 circumstance bonus on relevant skills but only if where properties such as sharpness, durability, and hardness play a notable role. A seardan-plated pen tip won’t do much for calligraphy. +750 GP, Tolerance 1.
  • Light/Medium/Heavy armor plated with Seardan grants DR of 2/3/4, which stacks with any innate DR the wearer possesses. +2000/4000/8000 GP, Tolerance of 2/3/4.
  • Seardan has 250 hit points per inch of thickness and hardness 25. It is not subject to rust, chemical corrosives, or most energies, and does not conduct electricity. It can be weakened by severe cold – but the temperatures required to achieve this result do not generally occur outside of cryogenic laboratories.

   Soulwards exploit the ability of Markhhan to contain and support spirits.

  • A Type I Spirit Ward simply absorbs assaults on the wearer’s psyche; attempts to possess, charm, dominate, or otherwise use enchantment/charm or enchantment/compulsion spells simply affect the amulet – which isn’t very useful.
  • A Type II Ward also diverts to itself ranged or area-effect attacks on the wearer’s life force, protecting the user from effects such as Circle of Death, Enervation, Finger of Death, Magic Jar, Power Word Kill, Trap the Soul,and similar monster powers.
  • A Type III Ward can also host the bearer’s spirit if he or she is slain; until the user gives it up and departs, he or she will be able to mentally communicate with anyone who touches the amulet and can possess any functioning, but currently-uninhabited, body with which the amulet comes in contact. Oddly enough, mindless undead corpses work just fine – but most spirits will prefer a properly-living body or having their original one repaired and restarted (which is much easier than recalling the soul). Sadly, a spirit trapped within an amulet will suffer the effects of attacks on the current bearer’s psyche or life force and a new spirit which attempts to displace the (or a) old one must engage in an opposed contest of wills.
  • A Type IV Ward can absorb the spirit of any being which dies within thirty feet, provided that it does not resist. Perhaps fortunately, such a Ward is effectively shielded – at least from other spirits – if it is embedded within living material.
  • A Type V Ward binds spirits so strongly that they must make a will save at DC 20 to avoid being entrapped by by it if they lose their bodies (whether by death, by engaging in astral projection, by attempting to use a magic jar effect, or by the use of some similar effect. Once entrapped within such an amulet, a spirit will remain trapped until it is released by an appropriate spell, by the destruction of the amulet, or by overloading the capacity of the Ward – in which case the loser in a contest of wills will be set free to pass onwards.
  • SoulWards normally have a capacity of one spirit – but can be upgraded to handle more.
  • Powerful enchanters – and individuals who can afford the process and are mad enough to want to undergo it – occasionally build constructs with a network of Markhhan control feeds, Glowstone Engines, and minor auxiliary enchantments, in which to mount their Type-III Soulwards after their physical death – allowing them to continue on in construct-bodies (although their minds and life forces remain just as normal, and vulnerable, as ever). Sadly, they usually go mad in fairly short order, but who said quasi-unlife was easy?

Type

GP Cost

DC

Tolerance

Type I

800

15

1

Type II

1200

20

2

Type III

2000

25

3

Type IV

3000

30

4

Type V

6000

35

5

+1 Spirit

+1000

+2

+0

   Spell Talismans feed power into a specific spell but are not “used up” in doing so. They provide the equivalent of one point of many when used in casting the appropriate spell, “+2” if the user exhausts their power for 2D4 days. DC of 10 + (2x the level of the spell to be affected), 1500 GP, Tolerance 1. In Shandar, where powerful spells needed extra mana to work in the face of the drain from the Cinghalum, these were vital. In other worlds, spell talismans reduce the effective level of a particular spell, allowing it to be used more easily.

   Some of those prices may not be quite right; it’s been years since the Shander setting was all that active, and I’ve mislaid the original pricing notes. Glowstone item were relatively cheap there, however, simply because the environment was so lethal and because the limitations of glowstone tolerance and poisoning were substantial. Even relatively low-level characters could afford to use glowstone gear – and hopefully they would bring back more than enough glowstone from their adventures to make up for it. Most such items will be unique in most other settings anyway.

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11 Responses

  1. I wonder… how much would an Immunity cost that allows nonliving characters to utilize Glowstone?

    A character of mine wants to utilize a specific Minor Artifact Armor, and while he has the 1-CP-recipe, he still needs to find a way around the fact he’s not alive (not undead or negative energy powered… he just doesn’t have a constitution score).

    Also, what amount of power does a glowstone-power-plant provide?
    After all, it is energy, so I’m sure it can be sold in some way, shape or form (if not for gp, then maybe in services or information). Some aberrations buy and sell next to anything, after all…

    • Never mind… I just realized there is literally an ability called device use… I feel stupid now^^°

      • Not at all. There’s a great deal of stuff in that book to keep track of.

        But yes, “Device use” will cover it – although the GM may come up with his own ideas of what the excess energies will do to a non-living character.

        A glowstone power plant provides enough power for a “mountainous” construct (such as the Death Star, or the SDF-1), a truly major city, or a similarly-populated swathe of the countryside – animating and powering machines in factories, driving streetcars, powering mills, pumping water, winding up siege engines, opening and closing gates, powering elevators, and so on. Sadly, while this eliminates maintenance, it only provides mechanical power – not heat or light (unless someone knows how to build a generator and the game master thinks it will work). .

        Fortunately, simply living in such a city doesn’t result in any noticeable level of glowstone contamination.

        I suspect that energy sales would be best operated like a roman-style water system – you send someone around to collect a regular fee for providing power (water), with the fees bearing some vague relationship to how much machinery they’re running. That wasn’t all that well organized, but they were in a similar position of lacking any really good way of measuring how much water any given “customer” was using.

      • Hmm… would I be able to Finesse that? Perhaps calling it “Necromind” to Finesse Int to be used to determine contamination instead of Con?

      • I can’t think of any reason why not – although I might lean towards Dexterity since it is affecting your body. Still, if it magically warps whatever your unliving entity uses for a mind or whatever fits your justification, that will work just fine.

      • Dexterity would work too… Now I just need a fancy name for it^^°

      • Ah well. That I can’t help much with. I’m not all that good at fancy names, or there wouldn’t be things in Eclipse like “Device Use”.

      • Hmm… I’ll be able to think of something, it can’t be too hard… i hope.

  2. […] is Glowstone… A necessity for the Channeler, as this allows the Channeler to be at least somewhat […]

  3. […] Alchemy (and it’s Item List) is pretty useless if no Glowstone is […]

  4. […] Alchemy (and it’s Item List) is pretty useless if no Glowstone is available. You could take an Immunity to actually having to […]

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